Nathan Finn on Election and Holiness

Nathan Finn is Associate Professor of  of Historical Theology and Baptist Studies and the Director of the new Center for Spiritual Formation and Evangelical Spirituality. This week he writes on the doctrine of election in the doctrine of holiness.

You may not know this, but evangelicals like to argue about the doctrine of election. This is especially true of evangelicals who frequent blogs. This is especially true of Southern Baptist evangelicals who frequent blogs.

It may surprise you to know that evangelicals agree on more than we disagree when it comes to the doctrine of election. For example, virtually everyone agrees that there is a doctrine of election because, well, it’s in the Bible. Furthermore, almost everyone agrees that all true followers of Jesus Christ are part of the elect. We may not agree on how believers “get” elected, but we all agree that there is a category called the elect and that believers are the folks in that category.

Please note I’m not trying to minimize the legitimate debates that honest Christians have about the finer points (see what I did there?) of the doctrine of election. However, in this post I want to focus on one of those aspects of election that I think we all agree upon, or at least ought to agree upon, and yet, in our rush to highlight our disagreements with one another, fail to emphasize enough. So here goes: if you are a Christian, you have been elected to holiness.

Ephesians 1:3–11 is one of the better-known New Testament passages that deals with the doctrine of election. In verse 4, Paul writes, “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places, even as he chose us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and blameless before him” (ESV). I think our tendency is to debate the “he chose us” part of the passage. However, let’s not miss the “holy and blameless” part of the text. Christians have been debating the “he chose us” part since way back when the Roman Empire was a global superpower. We probably won’t reach a consensus on that part until Christ’s kingdom is the last and permanent global superpower. But I’m hopeful we can find a consensus in the here and now on the “holy and blameless” phrase of this passage.

Brother and sister in Christ, your holiness is inevitable. You are among God’s chosen, in part, so that you can be holy and blameless. You have already been set apart through your justification as part of God’s holy people. You will one day complete the journey of holiness when you are fully conformed to the image of Christ at your final glorification. Along the way, you are called to become progressively more like Christ—to become more holy—through your sanctification. Not so that you can earn God’s favor. Not so that you can win holiness competitions with your friends. Not so that you can get a spiritual leg up on all the pagans around you. But so that you can, increasingly in this life, own what you’ve been set apart to be for the next life and beyond. Christian, you have been elected to holiness.

I believe this is an empowering truth. If part of what it means to be among the elect is to be holy, and if my holiness is guaranteed by God’s promise and provision, then my pursuit of holiness becomes a holy adventure rather than a legalistic burden or a licentious fatalism. I’m joining God in his work of making me holy when I put my sins to death. I’m joining God in his work of making me holy when I cultivate the fruit of the Spirit. I’m joining God in his work of making me holy when I practice spiritual disciplines. I’m joining God in his work of making me holy—and making others holy—when I encourage others in their pursuit of holiness (especially fellow church members). The same God who has ordained (elected!) the end has ordained (elected!) the means. I am holy. So I will fight for holiness. And I will be holy, forever, eventually.

If you are a believer, you are elect. And if you are elect, you’ve been elected, in part, to holiness. So, run hard after holiness today in anticipation of that future day when “we shall be like him, because we shall see him as he is” (1 John 3:2b).

 

CGCS: Stories Trump Statistics (Greg Mathias)

Every Wednesday morning at BtT we highlight the work of the Drummond Center for Great Commission Studies at Southeastern. Recently, Greg Mathias, Associate Director of the CGCS, wrote a blogpost about how the stories of unreached people and missionaries trump statistics about the same. He points to a story about work among the Uighur people of China.

Here’s an excerpt of the post:

Motivation to participate in the Great Commission and reach people needs to go beyond terms and statistics. Every man, woman, and child has a story. Take time this week to learn somebody’s story. Engage people in conversation. If you are interested in unreached, unengaged, and under-engaged peoples around the world, go beyond the statistics and start learning their stories, too.

Read the full post and the story about the Uighurs here.

The Child of a Storm

Tonight (Sept 16, 2014) Dr. Gerald Smith presents the Drummond-Bush lecture for the L. Russ Bush Center for Faith and Culture. The event will be held at the Wake Forest Baptist Church, which is located on the campus of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. The title of his lecture is “‘The Child of a Storm:’ The Civil Rights Act of 1964.” Dr. Smith is the Martin Luther King scholar-in-residence at the University of Kentucky.

Dr. Gerald Smith

Dr. Gerald Smith

Dr. Smith’s Tuesday night lecture is part of a two-day reflection on the role that people of faith played in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Tomorrow (Wednesday) at 10 am in Binkley Chapel, Dr. Danny Akin will lead a panel discussion in a special “Casual Conversations” chapel. Dr. Smith will be joined by civil rights historians Dr. David Roach (of Baptist Press) and Dr. Brent Aucoin (of Southeastern Seminary). Rounding out the panel will be Mr. Clarence Henderson, who in 1960 participated in the sit-in of the whites-only Woolworth diner in Greensboro, NC. (NPR has an excellent article about importance of the sit-in and Clarence Henderson’s role can be found here: “The Woolworth Sit-In That Launched a Movement”). Make plans to join us!