Engaging Exposition (18): Getting At The Main Idea of the Message (MIM)

April 29, 2011 by Daniel Akin

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The main idea of the message (MIM) is the heart and soul of your sermon. The MIM is derived from the MIT and channeled through the Purpose Bridge.

Just as the text has a singular theme/complement your teaching must have a singular theme/complement as well. For the MIM, you ask the key question, of yourself rather than of the biblical author.

The Main Idea of the Message

Theme: What am I talking about?

Complement: What am I saying about what I am talking about?

Six guidelines guide us in honing in on the MIM:

1) Develop the MIM with your audience in mind.

2) State the MIM in the most memorable sentence possible.

3) State it positively, not negatively, if possible.

4) State it in the active voice, not the passive voice.

5) State it in words or phrases which are precise, concrete, and familiar to your listeners.

6) State it so that the truth is readily seen as relevant to your audience and their needs.

What are the characteristics of a good MIM?

1) It is derived from the main idea of the text. The MIT determines the MIM.

2) It is what the preacher will be talking about in his message.

3) It is a carefully worded statement.

4) It is geared to the audience.

5) It has a subject and a complement.

6) It is a complete sentence that is memorable.

Now let us sound a word of warning in closing this chapter. Identifying the MIT/MIM does not give one license or permission to ignore the supporting ideas of the text. The supporting ideas must be allowed to support!

Faithful exposition will honor the whole text, big ideas and little ideas. This will allow the whole as well as the parts to fulfill their divinely inspired assignment. Key points will support the main point, and minor points will support the key points. Text-driven preaching will be our guide and compass every step of the way.

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