In Case You Missed It

Dr. Bruce Ashford recently shared a visual tour of the History of Ideas in the form of some of his student’s timeline projects.

One of the great privileges of my life has been the opportunity to teach History of Ideas at The College at Southeastern. Under the leadership of noted author and philosopher James K. Dew, the college requires its undergraduate students to take four courses in the History of Ideas.

 

The first History of Ideas course is a lecture-style grand tour of the rise and development of “thought,” of the way certain ideas have shaped our world, especially in the West. I teach this course and I lead the students to evaluate various ideas and ideologies in light of their logical coherence, empirical adequacy, and existential viability. But we also evaluate them from a distinctly Christian perspective, in light of Scripture and the Christian tradition.

 

During the course, I require my students—almost all of them freshmen—to create a “History of Ideas Timeline,” a sort of visual tour of the history of ideas. This year, several of those students did such a good job that I decided to post their timelines here on my website.

 

Steven Madsen shared a post at his personal blog discussing the difference between just knowing about Jesus and truly knowing Jesus and experiencing a relationship with Him.

Have you ever thought about the massive claims of Christianity?  “There is One God who created all things”, “God became man & dwelled among us”, “Jesus was crucified, buried, & resurrected, becoming the atonement for sin”. Even more so, “the God of the universe wants to know you, personally”, and “He loves you deeply”.  And what about the words of Jesus Himself, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” The weight of these statements cannot be overstated.  In fact, if true, these assertions are of eternal importance! All of history & every existing thing hinges on the claims of Christianity.  That’s big.

 

Its 2.2 billion, big.  Christianity is the largest religion in the world, making up nearly one-third of the world’s population. Or so the statistics say.

 

And there lies my question.  If one-third of the world claims Christianity why isn’t it more…noticeable?

 

For years I asked this question of myself.

 

Earlier this week, Chuck Lawless shared eleven reasons to love the senior adults in your church. Dr. Lawless writes:

Occasionally, I speak in a church that is predominantly senior adults. Each time I do, I think about how a church like that is going to survive – but I also remember why senior adults matter. Remembering these things reminds me to love them even as we make changes to grow the church.

 

Art Rainer posted an article this week discussing if pastors should give to their church.

God has designed us, not to be hoarders, but conduits through which His generosity flows.

When we give to our local church, we get to participate in all the amazing ministry God is doing through the church. It is a place of significant impact. He uses your generosity to your church to make a difference in the lives of those in the church, in your community, and around the world.

 

But what about the pastor of a church? Should he give to the church he pastors? It is a question many ask. His salary is derived from gifts given to the church. So if he gives back to the church, isn’t it just creating an unnecessary giving loop?

 

The quick answer is yes, the pastor should give to his church. Here are a few reasons why.

 

At The Gospel Coalition, Trevin Wax recently shared some things to consider before going for a Ph.D.

In December of 2015, I graduated from Southeastern Seminary with a Ph.D. in theology (with a focus on North American missiology). I’ve written before that the Ph.D. experience was one of the most demanding and rewarding of my life. It stretched me in ways that escape easy description.

 

The stamina that is required to persevere through the dissertation phase is enough to sidetrack a number of great scholars, and I now understand why I have friends and colleagues who have done everything necessary for their doctorate except finish their final dissertation. Just imagine. You come to the end of seminars and papers and comprehensive exams, only then to begin work on something that will require 100,000 words of writing and literally millions of words of reading. It’s enough to send shivers down the spine of the most committed student.

 

Earlier this week, a friend who is about to enter a Ph.D. program asked me a few questions about how I managed that season of life.

 

I hesitate to answer because, first, I’m not sure that I always managed it well or in an exemplary way. And secondly, because we are all different, we have different gifts and responsibilities. To say “here’s what you should do” seems woefully ill informed if not designed for someone’s unique situation. It would be much better to work with the people who know you and your situation best—your wife, your family, your church—to get specific answers on most questions.

 

But what I can do is offer some counsel based on what worked well for me.

 

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