In Case You Missed It

At The Peoples Next Door, Meredith Cook shared a post discussing how to survive the church as an introvert. Meredith writes:

If you register “I” on the spectrum of “HANG OUT WITH ALL THE PEOPLE” to “give me solitude or give me death”, then you, like me, probably struggle with community in the church. As an introvert, the balance between needing alone time to recharge and not neglecting others is hard. It is easy to value that time so much you neglect what is a necessary and biblical part of the Christian life — the church. I am guilty of, and I have witnessed others, using my so-called introversion as an excuse to neglect the church.

 

While I think there is some validity to the extrovert/introvert spectrum and how we relate to people, it is also largely a Western concept bred out of individualism and our desire to dictate who/what/when/where we spend time with people. However, this is not how we see believers relating to each other in the Bible. Christian community is illustrated throughout the Bible and rarely, if ever, do we see an individual forsaking people to get their alone time.

 

Aaron Earls posted an article at the Lifeway Pastor’s blog discussing the pastor’s challenge in recovering from the Christmas rush.

For many, work slows down during the Christmas season, but not for pastors. All the holiday festivities bring even more responsibilities. But no you’ve made it through the musicals, the small group parties, the Christmas Eve service, the increased benevolence demands from the community, and the extra visitors in the pews.

 

Hopefully, in the midst of it all, you’ve had a moment of peace to reflect on the coming of the Prince of Peace and an opportunity to celebrate with your family the Father sending the Son as the baby in a manger. But now what? As the Christmas season close to a close, how should you spend the last few days of the year? Here are five things you can do before the new year begins a new batch of tasks.

 

Paul Akin posted an article at the ERLC website titled: “Lottie Moon: A pioneer advocate for limitless sending.” Paul writes:

Billions of people are born, live their entire lives, and die without ever hearing the good news of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

 

Maybe you should read that sentence again, just to give it time to sink in.

 

Currently, there are more than seven billion people in the world. Missiologists estimate that over 2.8 billion of those people have little to no access to the gospel. That is a huge number, and its reality demands a limitless missionary force to take the gospel to unreached peoples and places around the world.

 

Jesus exhorted his disciples, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few, therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest” (Matt. 9:37–38). The same truth remains today.

 

Art Rainer recently shared nine steps to enjoying a sporting event with your kids on the cheap.

I love going to sporting events. So do my kids, ages three and six. But as you know, going to a sporting event can be a costly endeavor. Just about every part of the experience is expensive. And there is nothing worse than spending all that money and not walking away with an enjoyable memory. Over the past few years, I have been able to develop my own steps for creating an enjoyable memory with my kids at a sporting event.

 

How do I do it? Here are nine steps to enjoying a sporting even with young kids on the cheap

 

At his personal blog, Chuck Lawless shared twelve questions he’d like to ask pastors with 40+ years of experience. Dr. Lawless writes:

This year, I celebrated my 35th year in full-time ministry. I rejoice over God’s faithfulness through the years, but I’m also aware that I’m always one step away from falling. When I think about that reality, I’d love to convene a group of pastors with 40+ years of ministry behind them and ask them these questions

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