In Case You Missed It

At The Intersect Project, Dawn Johnson Mitchell shared 3 ways you can pray for public school educators.

The smell of cafeteria food is in the air. The sound of squeaking sneakers echoes through hallways. And yellow school buses pepper the highways.

 

This means one thing: School is back in session.

 

As the new school year begins, educators need your prayer. In working with veteran and novice teachers for over a decade, and from my own experiences as a classroom teacher, here are three specific ways you can pray.

 

The classroom use of personal technology by students is a hot topic in college and seminary classrooms. In this post at his personal blog, Dr. Jason Duesing shares his views on the topic.

In the 1980s, one of my television heroes was the debonair Alex P. Keaton. My admiration for APK centered not just for his quick wit and conservative politics, but mostly because he had a watch that was also a calculator. I don’t recall at what age I first acquired the same watch, but when I did I remember some anxiety about whether my teachers would allow me to wear it to school or in class–lest they think I was covertly doing pre-calculus on my wrist.

 

How to handle media use in the classroom has been a topic of discussion among educators at all levels for the better part of the last two decades, or more. And, when our culture entered an era of annual technological upgrades and the condensing of multiple devices into fewer things to carry, the collective academic fretting only increased.

 

When I first started teaching and was not much older than the students, I resisted the trend of allowing more and more devices and sought to control and limit all use of non-class-related technology by professorial fiat. However, some time ago, I changed my thinking and chose instead to embrace this brave new world and try my best to redeem it for constructive (or at least entertaining) purposes.

 

Micah Fries shared a post at his personal blog discussing white supremacy and moral equivalency. Micah writes:

“White supremacy is wrong. It is anti-gospel and ought to be opposed with every fiber of our being. You cannot love Christ and claim racial superiority.”

 

“Yes, but what about Black Lives Matter (BLM)? Or antifa?”

 

This conversation, or some variation of it has played out repeatedly across the country over the last few days. What should we do with it? Is it a valid question? Is there moral equivalency between the two arguments?

 

As we begin, let’s state upfront that, generally speaking, any group who employs violence and/or anarchist behavior in resistance to the rule of law should be considered to be on the wrong side of the Bible. This is true of white supremacists. This is true of the Alt-Right. This is true of BLM. This is true of antifa. This is true of those employing said behavior disconnected from any group. This is true of any yet to be named group. With rare exception, followers of Christ abhor disobedience to the rule of law, and particularly reject violence to accomplish those means.

 

In a post at the Baptist Press, J.D. Greear explained how believing is seeing.

Imagine that you’d been blind your whole life and, suddenly, through some medical miracle you regained your sight. How would you prove to someone that you are now in the light?

 

It’s not that you can logically prove the existence of light. It’s not that you can explain how the medicine worked. It’s simply because you can now see everything else because of that light.

 

John’s Gospel presents Jesus that way. It opens by saying that Jesus is the light that came into the world. God’s Word “became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen His glory” — the kind of glory that could only belong to God (John 1:14).

 

In a guest post at Thom Rainer’s blog, Jonathan Howe shared seven qualities of an effective church communications coordinator.

Church communications is a burgeoning field. And the position of church communications director/manager/coordinator has become ubiquitous in many large churches. But it’s not just the large churches that are looking to fill this role. Mid-size and small churches are realizing the importance of having a singular person responsible for their church’s communications and social media.

 

So what should a church look for when finding a full-time, part-time, or volunteer communications coordinator? These seven qualities should be evident in that person.

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