In Case You Missed It

At the Center for Great Commission Studies, Jim Dell shared about ministering to military families during the holidays.

When you think about Christmas and the holiday season, certain things tend to come to mind; presents, Jesus, time with friends and family, among other things. But some families will spend this season without their loved ones, I am referring to those families who have or had a loved one in the military.


In a post at The Gospel Coalition, Tony Merida argues that church planters are farmers, not rock stars.

Farmers are anything but rock stars. They get up early and work. They sow, plow, toil, and protect. In all of it, they beg God for rain.


That’s a good description of ministry. Ministry is glorious, but it’s not glamorous. Like farming, most of our work goes unseen; it demands attention and endurance. And at the end of the day, we’re desperate for God to give the growth (1 Cor. 3:7).


Often God does send rain, and those are rich and joyful seasons. Is there anything greater than seeing people come to faith, grow in holiness, and be equipped and deployed for ministry? Ministry is challenging, but by God’s grace it also can be joyful and rewarding. Like elsewhere in our Christian experience, it carries both sorrow and joy, pain and pleasure, trial and triumph.


When we see fruit, though, we must never go around boasting about what “we did.” (I’ve never seen a farmer “bragtweet” about the number of pumpkins he harvested.) No, our boast and joy must be in the Lord, who graciously uses us in his harvest field.


One of the highlights of the College at Southeastern curriculum is the History of Ideas program. In a recent post at his personal blog, Dr. Bruce Ashford highlighted one of the major assignments from this program.

One of the great joys of teaching at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary is the opportunity to teach History of Ideas at its undergraduate college, The College at Southeastern. Our college, led by noted author and philosopher James K. Dew, requires its undergraduate students to take four courses in the History of Ideas.


The first History of Ideas course is a lecture-style grand tour of the rise and development of “thought,” of the way certain ideas have shaped our world, especially in the West. We evaluate various ideas and ideologies in light of their logical coherence, empirical adequacy, and existential viability. But we also evaluate them from a distinctly Christian perspective, in light of Scripture and the Christian tradition.


At the Center for Great Commission Studies, Drs. Scott Hildreth and Greg Mathias shared some recommended reading for your holiday break.

Have a lot of extra time on your hands now that classes are complete? Looking for some last minute Christmas gifts? Want to find new resources to equip you for ministry? The Center for Great Commission Studies has shared what they’re reading currently and what is on their to-read lists. We’d like to share this with you and encourage you to check out these great resources!


Dr. Chuck Lawless shared ten thoughts at his personal blog to consider if your church is having a Christmas Eve service.

Just some quick thoughts to think about if your church is planning a Christmas Eve service this weekend…


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *