In Case You Missed It

In a recent post at The Intersect ProjectBruce Ashford published profiles of six of his heroes of cultural engagement.

At Intersect, we want to equip you to engage culture — bringing your faith to bear on every corner of your life. And to learn how to engage culture well today, we should learn from people who have engaged culture well in the past.


Bruce Ashford published profiles of six heroes of cultural engagement — and we’ve compiled these posts for you below.


At his personal blog, Danny Akin shared some thoughts about how we might be wrongly judgemental.

How can those of us who have been redeemed from all of our sins by the precious blood of Christ rightly make judgments without wrongly being judgmental? Let me share some thought for our consideration.


At The Intersect Project, Josh Herring shared how he went from being a socialist sympathizer to embracing free market capitalism.

In 2011, I graduated from Hillsdale College as a mild socialist sympathizer. My studies of history had convinced me that capitalism caused as much harm as good, and that the socialistic drive to distribute economic goods to care for the weak of society resonated with Christian compassion. Between 2011 and 2016, my view changed as I discovered a deeper understanding of the biblical view of economics. The 2016 election brought these competing economic visions into the national spotlight.


Will the pro-life movement sink or swim? That was the question Dayton Hartman recently tackled in a post at The Intersect Project.

Learning to swim is a terrifying experience. You are thrown into a body of liquid that could fill your lungs and kill you within minutes, and you’ve got to figure out how to stay on top of that liquid or die. This fun, summertime activity really is a life and death struggle.


I remember when I learned to swim in a pool full of still, over-chlorinated and temperature-controlled water. I felt like I’d done it. I was a swimmer! I could doggy-paddle around the pool that was surrounded by semi-attentive teenage lifeguards who were at least mildly concerned with my safety and survival. It was a controlled environment with one task: don’t sink into the still and easily navigable waters.


At the Center for Great Commission Studies, Scott Hildreth discussed making 2018 a missionary year.

I am not a huge fan of New Year’s Resolutions. They always seem to be good ideas that fail within a few months. On the other hand, I am a huge fan of taking advantage of the changing calendar for reassessment and re-alignment. When I was in high school, I did a little surfing on the Gulf Coast. One thing I learned was the importance of putting something (usually an ice chest) on the beach to mark where I walked in the water. You see, the pull of the current and the act of chasing the next wave always pulled me away from the starting point. This happened so subtly that I was rarely aware of how far I had drifted. To keep my bearings, or to avoid drifting too far, I had to watch the marker and adjust my position in the water. The coming of a new year gives us all a chance to evaluate our lives and make adjustments so we can keep our bearings throughout the chaos of life.


In a post at his personal blog, Chuck Lawless shared eight footprint tracks toward moral failure.

I love hiking and backpacking. Recently, I read an article about recognizing “critters” in an area by looking at footprint tracks in the dirt. Some tracks aren’t alarming, but others say, “Be careful. There could be trouble in the area.” Based on my knowledge of far too many moral failures among church leaders, here are some “footprint tracks” that could signal upcoming trouble.


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