In Case You Missed It

At the Intersect Project, Michael Guyer reviewed Removing the Stain of Racicm from the Southern Baptist Convention, by Jarvis J. Williams and Kevin M. Jones.

Racism has been a glaring stain within the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) since 1845, the year it was founded in Augusta, GA. And yet, by God’s grace, we are not the convention we once were. The 2017 SBC Annual Meeting showed us we still have more work to do. In the weeks following the SBC Annual Meeting, two different black pastors wrote contrasting articles—Lawrence Ware’s New York Time’s op-ed, “Why I am Leaving the Southern Baptist Convention”, and Dwight McKissic’s response in the Washington Post, “I’m a black pastor. Here’s why I’m staying in the Southern Baptist Convention.” While saddened by Ware’s conclusion, these articles highlight the continuing need to address racial justice and reconciliation within the SBC. I am especially grateful for McKissic’s voice in this conversation. His conclusion is worth repeating:

 

The SBC has its shortcomings, but churches that focus their attention on the mission of our Lord Jesus will not find a better body to cooperate with than the SBC. Not everything in the SBC is what it should be, but I am called to work within to help it become what it can be.

That’s why I remain.

In this same spirit, Jarvis Williams and Kevin Jones have given Southern Baptists, and any denomination with ears to hear, a great gift in Removing the Stain of Racism From the Southern Baptist Convention: Diverse African American and White Perspectives. It is the gift of honest reflection and thoughtful responses to the remaining stain of racism within the SBC.

 

Dr. Greg Mathias posted an article at The Center for Great Commission Studies titled Too Much Hustle, Too Little Heaven. Dr Matthias writes:

Heaven has invaded my thoughts a bit more over the past few weeks. While I cannot pinpoint a particular reason as to why my thoughts have been more heavenward, it’s been refreshing to consider this life in light of eternity.

 

Before the last few weeks, it strikes me how little I think about heaven. This isn’t just the fallout from a busy life and a forgetful mind, but it’s probably more accurate to say that it is because I think too little of heaven. My thoughts are wrapped up in what is right before me–the daily hustle. I find it difficult to consider anything beyond my next appointment notification, much less eternity. I live a consumed life focused on this world at the expense of my future, more permanent, and heavenly home. Perhaps you can relate?

 

At The Peoples Next Door, Keelan Cook asked: “Is door-knocking making a comeback?”

When I was in high school (in the late 90s), I discovered vintage clothes. In the small town where I grew up, we had small businesses known as “dig stores.” They were vintage clothing shops that had a large piles of clothes on tables or in a room where you sorted through clothing, looking for buried treasure. I remember the first time I found a pair of bell bottom blue jeans.

 

Anyone with just a bit of age on them knows that some fashions return to haunt us. When I was in high school, my parents laughed at my clothes, saying the 70s had returned. Today, I laugh as styles from the 90s climb out of their grave. Fashion is apparently not the only things from our past that revisit, and when it comes to local missions, that may be a good thing.

 

A couple of weeks ago, I ran across an article in the Baptist Press lauding the return of door-knocking as an outreach method for contemporary churches. Robin Cornetet, the author, writes, “A Louisville pastor has busted the longstanding myth in the church world that door-to-door visitation is out of vogue and no longer effective.” The piece continues by pointing to Mark Bishop, the campus pastor for a Louisville church, who has developed the practice of knocking on 200 doors per week. The results, almost 40 baptisms over six months.

 

Is the practice of door-knocking coming back around to contemporary church practice? I will put my cards on the table and say I hope so.

 

The Intersect Project interviewed SEBTS staff photographer Maria Estes about how she uses her talent of photography for God’s glory.

In many vocations, you can clearly see how God is using your work for his glory. A construction worker builds a home that families can live in. A teacher invests in the next generation. A doctor saves lives.

 

In other vocations, the connection seems less clear. What if your work involves carrying a camera around? What if you spend most of your working hours in an office, editing photos on a computer screen?

 

Maria Estes is a photographer at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, and many of her days involve such tasks. Recently, we had a chance to chat with Maria about photography. In our conversation, you’ll see how God can use her work for his glory — and how he can use yours, too. Here’s our conversation.

 

In a guest post at Dr. Thom Rainer’s blog, Jonathan Howe discussed how to handle negative Facebook comments about your church. Jonathan writes:

When churches have Facebook pages, negative comments will come your way. Whether it’s a former church member, someone from the community, or an online troll, it’s likely that at some point someone will comment negatively about your church on Facebook.

 

So what do you do? Do you defend the church? Do you just delete the comment and move on?

 

How you respond depends on three things, mainly.

 

Dr. Jason K. Allen, president of Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary interviewed Dr. Art Rainer, Vice President for Institutional Advancement at Southeastern Seminary about the preacher and money.

This week on Preaching and Preachers, Art Rainer joins me in a discussion on the preacher and money. Art serves as the Vice President for Institutional Advancement at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is also cofounder of Rainer Publishing, and he has written four books: Raising DadSimple LifeThe Minister’s Salary, and The Money Challenge.