Benjamin Quinn: Student-hood as Neighbor-Love

Last September, Dr. Benjamin Quinn shared two articles here at Between the Times discussing the subject of student-hood and neighbor-love. As a new school year is getting started, it’s a great time to review those posts.

In Part 1, Dr. Quinn discusses the relationship between fellow students. Dr. Quinn writes:

We will begin by considering the peer-to-peer relationships between fellow students.  At least five areas emerge where neighbor-love directly affects how peers relate while students.  The first is pretty straightforward—that dreadful word that has plagued us since Kindergarten—attendance!  Don’t worry, I will not attempt a case for “perfect attendance” here.  If we are serious about loving our fellow students, however, showing up to class should be a priority.  I’ll leave it at that for now.

 

In Part 2, Dr. Quinn focuses on the relationship between students and professors. Dr. Quinn writes:

What does neighbor-love look like for the relationship between professor and student?  We will consider this in light of classroom etiquette, respect and expectations.

 

Classroom etiquette sets the tone for neighbor love towards one’s professor.  By etiquette, I’m especially referring to attendance, participation and good listening.  In part one, we considered the importance of professors creating an open, participatory environment where listening and learning flows both from teacher to student and from student to teacher.  But, now it is important to underscore that the professor is the classroom leader.

 

Dr. Benjamin Quinn is Assistant Professor of Theology and History of Ideas at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, and Associate Dean of Institutional Effectiveness for the College at Southeastern.

Back to School thoughts from Dr. Alvin Reid

Over the past couple of weeks at his personal blog, Dr. Alvin Reid shared a series of three posts, each relating to different groups who will be starting a new semester at Southeastern: Seminary Students, College Students, and Seminary Professors.

In his first post, he shared eight suggestions for eager new seminarians:

I remember a cold, windy day in January, 1982. My wife Michelle and I arrived in Fort Worth as newlyweds with everything we owned in a small U Haul trailer. We moved into our little one bedroom, furnished apartment with little materially but great dreams spiritually. I hobbled on crutches from a knee operation. We were broke, but we were called, and that was enough.

 

That was 35 years ago, but it seems like only yesterday. If you are a brand new seminarian, I have a few things I hope will encourage you to help you for the next few decades.

 

Next, Dr. Reid wrote to college students, exhorting them to not waste their (college) life.

Last week I wrote a post to encourage new seminarians as they begin their journey. I had some friends ask me to do something similar for incoming college freshmen, so here you go. NOTE: This is written first to our new students at The College at Southeastern, and then to any student starting out at an evangelical school. These generally would apply to a student starting at a state school as well, but I added a final point for these students.

 

This fall I teach an evangelism class in our college. I’m also speaking several days at Oklahoma Baptist University and at William Carey College, and I’ve had the joy of speaking at many Christian colleges over the years. I love the excitement (and to some extent, the apprehension) of college freshman. I saw a study a few years ago that said the loneliest people in America are college freshmen. I want to encourage you and push you to think of ways to enjoy college while not wasting these valuable years.

 

Finally, Dr. Reid shared a post with a simple prayer for seminary professors.

In our Southern Baptist Convention we have developed a fellowship of professors who teach evangelism as all or part of their role in academia. My friend Tom Johnston at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary has been instrumental in this group’s growth and connectivity. This year I’m blessed to serve as president of the group, known as SBC Evangelism Profs.

 

I sent an email to all the professors the other day. I included a prayer I will be praying for them and for me as we go through this academic year. While applied to evangelism profs, I think it’s appropriate for faculty at any confessional school committed to the great commission. It’s simple, like me. Perhaps it will encourage you.