Archives for category: Culture

What if a Nation Self-Exterminates? The Disturbing Situation in Japan

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The Japanese have stopped having children. Or more precisely, they are not having enough children to maintain the nation’s population. According to a recent article in The Week magazine (“Japan’s Population Crisis”, 01-07-14, p. 11), Japan’s population is “dropping rapidly” and will soon be declining at a rate of one million per … Read More »

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Business, Vocation, and the Great Commission

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This week the Bush Center, along with the Acton Institute, hosts the “Business, Vocation, and the Great Commission” conference. The meeting addresses three important subjects: 1) a biblical approach to a free market economy; 2) a practical approach for Christians to do workplace ministry; and 3) developing a missiological strategy … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: Ideas Still Have Consequences

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Readers of a certain age will no doubt remember the 1960s and 70s. Among many infelicities committed by American scholars and intellectuals in those decades was the demotion and near-dismissal of the study of intellectual history (the discipline which tells the history of major ideas and thinkers) from the American … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: On the Ethics of Anonymous Sperm Donation

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Not that I watch Vince Vaughn movies. But, Delivery Man, starring Vaughn and released last fall, tells the story of an anonymous sperm donor who had “fathered” over 500 children. The premise of the movie is that the anonymous donor’s children are suing to find his identity. It is billed … Read More »

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Why Can’t Evangelicals and Evolution Just Get Along, Already

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This guest post comes courtesy of Chris Pappalardo, my research assistant and a pastor at the Summit: “I don’t personally have a problem with religious faith, even in the extreme, as long as it doesn’t supersede science and it’s not used to impose outdated mores on others.” So wrote Charles … Read More »

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What We Talk About When We Talk About Blessing

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The word “blessed” gets thrown around a lot in Christian circles. Often it just means wealthy: “So-and-so is really blessed” means, “He’s got a big bankroll.” Other times it seems to be synonymous with good circumstances: I’ve heard one preacher describe the “blessing of God” on his life when he … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: A Reflection on Peter Singer’s “Morality Pill”

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Readers of Between the Times might remember that we have written several pieces about the unfortunate moral and philosophical peregrinations of Princeton ethicist Peter Singer, who is known for approving of certain forms of bestiality (which he calls “zoophilia”) and infanticide. Today’s blog likewise reflects upon Singer’s moral philosophy, but … Read More »

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On Russell Moore, Evangelicals, and Political Engagement

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The sharp-sighted cultural commentator Russell Moore strikes again. In “Evangelical Retreat?”, published in the December edition of First Things, he responds to the concern that younger Evangelicals’ drift away from conservative political activism is underlain by closet liberalism, political disinterest, or perhaps some other infelicity.[1] His answer, which I think … Read More »

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Race & Faith (5): Concluding Reflections

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Race matters, and it matters to God. In this blog series I have attempted to address a less-than-optimal situation that often exists in conservative evangelical (e.g. Baptist) circles. In this situation race and racism are not given much attention, and our limited discourse about race and racism often are shaped … Read More »

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Race & Faith (4): The Life of Christ

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As noted in the previous posts, secular models fail biblically and properly to point the way forward in creating an environment hospitable to racial unity-in-diversity. They fail for various reasons, but they especially fail to understand human depravity, which underlies racism. They also fail to account for the life of … Read More »

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