Archives (Page 2) for category: Culture

Race & Faith (3): Mutual Responsibility

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In the first installment of this series I articulated a desire for God’s people (especially his Baptist people) to foster a healthy racial unity-in-diversity as a way of reflecting the gospel and previewing his future kingdom. It recognized that we have a long way to go in this area, and … Read More »

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Race & Faith (2): Four Secular Models for Dealing with Racism

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In the previous installment of this series, we noted that evangelicals have not quite made the progress we might think we have in terms of overcoming racism. One reason is that many of us have not crafted a biblically informed and conceptually clear model for understanding race and racism. If … Read More »

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Race & Faith (1): A Prayer for Racial Unity and Diversity in our Churches

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Over the course of the past twenty years, I have filled the pulpit of several hundred churches in the United States. Those churches belong to more than 20 denominations, though most are Southern Baptist. During this twenty-year stretch, I cannot remember more than, say, 20 churches that were multi-racial. Although … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: On Poverty Alleviation and Faith-Based Initiatives

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In the 2013 issue of the Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics, Keri Day tackles an important question about the efficacy and propriety of Faith-Based Initiatives in the United States.[1] Faith-Based Initiatives are, by definition, government sponsored programs that provide resources to religious organizations for the express purpose of … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: An Outrageous Idea for Universities & Seminaries

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Just asking. If an institution of higher education were to offer Ph.D. programs (which prepare future professors), do you think it would include some readings and seat time addressing the topic of, ahem, how to be a good teacher? This is the question Derek Bok asks in his fine little … Read More »

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On Evangelicals and Race: Two Recommendations

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Yesterday, my fellow contributor Bruce Ashford published an important blog post titled “On Affirmative Action and ‘Wishing You Were Black.’” Bruce accurately points out what I’m just beginning to learn: it is difficult for caucasians to understand exactly how minorities view racism because our position of cultural privilege so informs … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: On Affirmative Action and “Wishing You Were Black”

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In a recent article in The Chronicle of Higher Education Angela Onwuachi-Willig argues that many whites do not understand affirmative action because they do not understand racism.[1] Moreover, she claims, some whites do not understand race itself. The occasion for Onwuachi-Willig’s essay is the recent Supreme Court decision on Fisher … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: On Susan Olasky, Religious Belief, and Adoption

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In a recent article for World Magazine Susan Olasky highlights an ongoing movement that opposes international and intercultural adoptions. One hopes that movement, which has the potential to restrict Christians from being adoptive parents, does not gain traction. Olasky begins by noting that the tide seems to be turning against … Read More »

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On Celebrating Thanksgiving Christianly

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Thanksgiving has always been a secular American holiday. Nevertheless, it is one that, when celebrated in a particular way, resonates with the Christian worldview perhaps as much as any holiday besides Christmas and Easter. When celebrated in an intentionally Christian manner, Thanksgiving can be a spiritual discipline. The holiday reminds … Read More »

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On Russell Moore and Convictional Kindness in the Public Square

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The wickedly keen theologian and ethicist Russell D. Moore will arrive on SEBTS’ campus December 3 in order to preach in chapel, speak to the faculty, and serve on a panel for the general public that evening. In preparation for his visit, I’ve had opportunity to re-read his inaugural address … Read More »

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