No Place Left

Recently the Center for Great Commission Studies blogged about the movement of the gospel in Myanmar. Here’s an excerpt: 

When me and my friend arrived after a 16 hour bus ride from Yangon, we had no plans. We were simply asking God for open doors through our national partners for effective work. And open doors He did. Through local partners that had started a church planting school and hostile, God put us to work. Over a four-day period we had the privilege to train local leaders and future church planters in a CPM process called “The Four Fields of Kingdom Growth.” The discipleship engine within this process is T4T (Training for Trainers). In other words, we trained the leaders in reproducing best practices for planting churches.

Read the full post here.

The CGCS on Christian Hospitality (Keelan Cook)

Every Wednesday morning we highlight the writing and work of the folks in the Center for Great Commission Studies. Recently, Keelan Cook, the Urban Resource Coordinator for the CGCS and PhD student at SEBTS, wrote about holiday hospitality and the Christian mission.

Here’s an excerpt:

Throughout the Old Testament, the people of God were commanded to welcome the sojourner (think Deut 10:19). The New Testament does not ease up on the issue either. Instead, the kingdom of God is radically inclusive, making no distinction between peoples. One need look no further than Jesus’ parable of the good samaritan (Luke 10) for a proper understanding of loving your neighbor. . . . Hospitality opens doors. Sharing a meal is more than a way into people’s homes, it is a way into their hearts.

Read the full post here.

Greg Mathias on (Not) Fearing the Beard

Every Wednesday morning we highlight the writing and work of Southeastern’s Center for Great Commission Studies. This week, Associate Director Greg Mathias writes about evangelism and mission to Mormons by way of a bearded case study.

Here’s an excerpt:

Yes, our Mormon friends are in the news again. This time it is not for multiple wives, celestial planets, or sacred undergarments. It’s not even a news flash telling us of the changing fashion trends of your favorite Mormon missionary on two wheels. It is a brouhaha over facial hair choices often associated with No Shave November.

 

A growing group of BYU students are petitioning to have the beard-ban lifted on campus. What’s wrong with beard glory, you ask? Well, from the 1970s onward, the beard is a spiritual faux pas since it is identified with hippies, protesters, revolution, immodest fashion trends, and lack of spiritual cleanliness.

 

While the battle of the beard wages on the BYU campus, I’m going to let you in on a little secret: the beard is not to be feared. Mormons too often try and cozy up to Christianity, but the beard ban is just another example of the incongruity between these two worldviews.

Read the full post here.