The Professor’s Bookshelf: Dr. Tate Cockrell

This series at Between the Times highlights Southeastern faculty members as they share about books which they are enjoying now, books which have shaped them personally, and books they consistently recommend to others.

This week, we interview Dr. Tate Cockrell.

Dr. Cockrell is Associate Professor of Counseling and the Assistant Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program at Southeastern.

 

What are some books you are reading right now?

I don’t read multiple books simultaneously usually. The two most recent books I’ve read are Saving Normal: An Insider’s Revolt against Out-of-Control Psychiatric Diagnosis, DSM-5, Big Pharma, and the Medicalization of Ordinary Life by Frances Allen and How to Deal with Difficult Relationships: Bridging the Gaps That Separate People by June Hunt. I’m currently reading, The Pastor and Counseling: The Basics of Shepherding Members in Need by Pierre and Reju.
 

What are some of the books which have had the largest impact on your life, thinking, or teaching?

AW Tozer’s, The Pursuit of God, was given to me shortly after I became a Christ follower and served as the first foundational book in my discipleship. Similarly, Oswald Chambers, My Utmost for His Highest, was the first devotional I read after becoming a Christian. Two books by Rick Yount, Created to Learn and Called to Teach have had the greatest impact on my teaching ministry. I had the blessing of studying under Dr. Yount  in my Master’s and Doctoral studies.

 

What are some of your favorite works of fiction?

I’m a huge Dean Koontz fan. His books aren’t Christian but they all have a spiritual component to them. They are classic good vs. evil thrillers, and they are just weird enough for me to enjoy. I’m also a John Grisham fan. So, I read most of his books as well.
 

Are there any books which you re-read on a regular basis and why?

I read AW Tozer’s, The Pursuit of God, every year. It had a profound impact upon my early Christian development. I also read Howard Hendricks book Teaching to Change Lives: Seven Proven Ways to Make Your Teaching Come Alive every couple of years. It serves as a great reminder of how to teach for maximum impact.
 

What is one book which you would recommend to a church member and why?

Becoming a True Spiritual Community: A Profound Vision of What the Church Can Be by Larry Crabb. This book completely revolutionized the way I think about church. If every church member reads this book, they would see the necessity and impact of true biblical community.
 

What is one book which you would recommend to a seminary student to read beyond what they might encounter in class and why?

What’s Best Next: How the Gospel Transforms the Way You Get Things Done by Matthew Perman.

So much of ministry is about how to prioritize and make the best use of our time. Perman does an exceptional job of laying out a Gospel centered way of making decisions about our daily tasks. I think most seminary students would benefit greatly from his wisdom.

The Professor’s Bookshelf: Walter Strickland

This series at Between the Times highlights Southeastern faculty members as they share about books which they are enjoying now, books which have shaped them personally, and books they consistently recommend to others.

This week, we interview Walter Stickland.

Professor Strickland is Special Advisor to the President for Diversity, and also teaches Theology at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

What are some books you are reading right now?

 What are some of the books which have had the largest impact on your life, thinking, or teaching?

What are some of your favorite works of fiction?

Unfortunately, I did not become a reader until I was given theological literature so I haven’t read many fiction books, but I love reading Lewis.

 Are there any books which you re-read on a regular basis and why?

I’ve read the following books multiple times:

 What is one book which you would recommend to a church member and why?

Bartholomew and Goheen’s The True Story of the Whole World because it is a faithful summary of scripture, and because scripture interprets itself, it offers a hermeneutical lens to understand their devotional reaching as they work through smaller chunks of Scripture.

 What is one book which you would recommend to a seminary student to read beyond what they might encounter in class and why?

Beyond many of the texts mentioned above, I’d suggest Lesslie Newbigin’s Foolishness to the Greeks because it helps to transform the way that those who dwell in the West understand the Christian life as a missiological encounter with the culture at large.

The Professor’s Bookshelf: Dr. Bruce Little

This series at Between the Times highlights Southeastern faculty members as they share about books which they are enjoying now, books which have shaped them personally, and books they consistently recommend to others.

This week, we interview Dr. Bruce Little.

Dr. Little is Senior Professor of Philosophy and is the Director of the Francis A. Schaeffer Collection at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

What are some books you are reading right now?

 What are some of the books which have had the largest impact on your life, thinking, or teaching?

 What are some of your favorite works of fiction?

 Are there any books which you re-read on a regular basis and why?

Not as a rule—only the ones I use as textbooks. That is to keep the content fresh in my mind.

The only one that I turn the pages occasionally would be The Tapestry by Edith Schaeffer

What are some books which you would recommend to a church member and why? 

  • Fool’s Talk, Os Guinness. It is most helpful in sharing the Gospel today and it is most readable.
  • Making Sense of God, Timothy Keller. Very helpful in speaking Christ into modern man.
  • Reclaiming Conversation, Sherry Turkle. It reveals the harmful effects of the misuse (or over use)  of media technology on the humanness of humanity. This is important because most Christians simply lack the courage to restrict the use of media technology either in their own lives, or the lives of their children if they have any. This book as well as a number of others reveal that fact that media technology is not morally benign. The book is very readable and is written by someone highly qualified.

 What are some books which you would recommend to a seminary student to read beyond what they might encounter in class and why?

I know that my student’s will encounter these books, but just in case others don’t I recommend:

Both of these books do intellectual history on the development of the western mind which is something often lacking in the reading of most Christians. If we do not, however,  understand the ideas behind what has been and is happening in the western world, it is most probably we will fail in understanding truly where the conflict lies (to steal a phrase from Alvin Plantinga. That means, any thought of  how to move forward with the truth claims of Christ will probably be short-sighted or miss the target altogether crippling the best of intentions. The unfortunate reality about these books is that their analysis only goes through the 1970’s, but at least these two books show the importance of  intellectual history.