Archives for category: Engaging Exposition (Danny Akin)

Engaging Exposition (19): The Work of Exposition: Structuring the Message

Pin It

Engaging exposition requires the preacher of God’s Word to develop a comprehensive and structured method for moving from his study notes and research to the completed sermon. John Stott says, “the golden rule for sermon outlines is that each text must be allowed to supply its own structure.”* An effective … Read More »

Comments (3)

Engaging Exposition (18): Getting At The Main Idea of the Message (MIM)

Pin It

The main idea of the message (MIM) is the heart and soul of your sermon. The MIM is derived from the MIT and channeled through the Purpose Bridge. Just as the text has a singular theme/complement your teaching must have a singular theme/complement as well. For the MIM, you ask … Read More »

Comments (0)

Engaging Exposition (17): The Bridge From Study To Sermon

Pin It

This is where you transition from the study to the message, from the past world of the biblical period to the present world of the here and now. To ignore this dimension in the hermeneutical/homiletical process can be fatal to what happens when you stand up to proclaim the unsearchable … Read More »

Comments (2)

Engaging Exposition (16): Getting at the Main Idea of the Text (MIT)

Pin It

The main idea of a text (step 3) naturally derives from our studying of the Scriptures (step 1) and our structuring of the Scriptures (step 2). Having prayed over the entire process, we have: 1) tracked and identified the key verbs and parsed them; 2) looked for key words needing … Read More »

Comments (0)

Engaging Exposition (15): Developing the Main Idea of the Text

Pin It

By way of summary, we have noted the following as essential components of steps one (studying) and two (structuring) of the hermeneutical process: 1. Study the book as a Whole. Consider the questions of date, authorship, recipients, and purpose (general matters of introduction.) Develop an outline of the entire book … Read More »

Comments (0)

Engaging Exposition (14): Identifying the Main Idea of the Text

Pin It

Our exegetical model requires the interpreter to inspect, inquire, and investigate every biblical text. When this is done, it is time to identify the author’s main idea of the text (MIT). This is the fourth and final stage of the exegesis process. Much has been written about the importance of … Read More »

Comments (0)

Engaging Exposition (13): Issues Concerning Context

Pin It

The inspection stage of exegesis moves toward completion once we have identified the genre and developed a genre-specific outline. These two elements are required to properly examine the content of a text. The next stage can be called the inquiry stage. “Inquire” means to ask a question. In this stage, … Read More »

Comments (1)

Engaging Exposition (12): Analysis of Poetry

Pin It

The development of a thematic outline will help you discover the author’s MIT when you encounter Poetry in the Scriptures. It is essential to consider rhyme and meter and the use of figurative language when interpreting Poetry. Poetry Type and Pattern There are a variety of poetic styles in the … Read More »

Comments (0)

Engaging Exposition (11): Analysis of Epistles

Pin It

The Epistle is the one of the predominant types of prose found in the New Testament. Epistolary literature is propositional in nature and requires a careful analysis of both its linguistic and literary contexts. Interpreters must remember several things as they outline Epistles. First, the author’s MIT is not found … Read More »

Comments (0)

Engaging Exposition (10): The Importance of Structuring the Text

Pin It

Once we have determined the genre of a biblical text, it is essential to analyze the structure of the text. The second step of the inspection process is the development of a teaching outline. Today, some pastor-teachers minimize or neglect this aspect of exegesis altogether. We remain convinced, however, that … Read More »

Comments (0)