In Case You Missed It

1) At Desiring God, Joe Rigney, Assistant Professor of Theology and Christian Worldview at Bethlehem College and Seminary, writes about the many desires or cravings beneath our sinful conflicts.

2) Over at the Gospel Project Blog, Devin Maddox, PhD student in Applied Theology at SEBTS, discusses Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s contribution to a theology of making disciples according to the Great Commission.

3) Eric Geiger looks to the business world to consider 4 leadership traits that better serve their organizations and thus the world.

4) From the Daily Signal, Ryan Anderson of the Heritage Foundation on what you need to know about gay marriage and the supreme court.

5) Earth Day was on Wednesday, so Russ Moore discussed whether or not Christians should care about it (and the earth).

 

Four Signs that Ministry Has Become All About You

Recently, J. D. Greear considered some signs that pastors and other ministers can look for to discern if they have become all about themselves. Here’s an excerpt:

Sadly, most of us can all too easily recount stories of pastors who betrayed their congregations, who hurt the very people God had called them to love, who—in short—made their ministry all about them.

 

Some of these pastors may have had their own inflated sense of grandeur from day one. But more often than not, these are the same guys who entered the ministry legitimately wanting to serve others, not angling to build an empire. And yet somewhere along the way, they got a taste for glory. And instead of being the shepherds of God’s people, teaching them to have faith in God, they become stumbling blocks, impediments keeping people from considering God at all.

Read the full post here.

Augustine for the Americans

Yesterday, Canon and Culture posted Bruce Ashford’s essay on Augustine’s relevance for 21st century American Christians, “Augustine for Americans: Lessons on Christianity & Public Life from a Fifth-Century North African Theologian.”

Here’s an excerpt:

Augustine worked hard to understand his cultural context, immersing himself in the historical, political, philosophical, and religious literature of his day. We, too, should work hard to understand the cultural context of our day. If, as Rieff argues, culture undergirds social order and if we live in a day when many of our culture-makers are producing deathworks, then our (American) service to God includes the necessity of exposing these deathworks for what they are. We dare not wait until Rome is burning to raise the alarm.

Read the full post here. It will be worth your time.