Archives (Page 2) for category: Theology

On the Baptist Confession of 1689

Pin It

The Second London Confession is the most influential Baptist confession of faith ever written. The Second London Confession was drafted in 1677 for the Petty France Church in London, during a time when Baptists and other Dissenters were being persecuted under the Clarendon Code. When William and Mary ascended to … Read More »

Comments (5)

What We Talk About When We Talk About Blessing

Pin It

The word “blessed” gets thrown around a lot in Christian circles. Often it just means wealthy: “So-and-so is really blessed” means, “He’s got a big bankroll.” Other times it seems to be synonymous with good circumstances: I’ve heard one preacher describe the “blessing of God” on his life when he … Read More »

Comments (2)

How To Stay Christian in Seminary

Pin It

Satan is alive and well. One of the ways the enemy wreaks havoc in seminaries and Christian colleges is by causing young men and women to grow personally numb to the spiritual truths they are studying in their classes. We’ve all met seminary graduates who felt like they had to … Read More »

Comments (1)

The Doctrine of Hell: Closing Thoughts

Pin It

This is the last in a five-part series on the doctrine of hell. Click here for part one, part two, and part three, and part four. Whenever I speak or write about hell, I receive a fair amount of pushback. Some of it comes from well-meaning and scripturally savvy friends whom I respect. The question … Read More »

Comments (2)

Briefly Noted: A Reflection on Peter Singer’s “Morality Pill”

Pin It

Readers of Between the Times might remember that we have written several pieces about the unfortunate moral and philosophical peregrinations of Princeton ethicist Peter Singer, who is known for approving of certain forms of bestiality (which he calls “zoophilia”) and infanticide. Today’s blog likewise reflects upon Singer’s moral philosophy, but … Read More »

Comments (3)

The Doctrine of Hell: Those Who Have “Never Heard”

Pin It

This is the fourth in a five-part series on the doctrine of hell. Click here for part one, part two, and part three. I’ve heard the question more times than I can count: “If people are only saved by believing the gospel, what about those who have never heard the gospel?” The idea that God … Read More »

Comments (2)

Andrew Fuller’s Advice for Your Daily Quiet Time

Pin It

Various Christian traditions tend to emphasize different practices when it comes to cultivating a healthy personal piety. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, prayerful meditation, often with the aid of icons, has occupied a signal place in personal spirituality. In Roman Catholicism, Marian piety remains a perennial emphasis. In Anglicanism, the … Read More »

Comments (2)

The Doctrine of Hell: Religious Exclusivity

Pin It

This is the third in a five-part series on the doctrine of hell. Click here for part one and part two. Closely related to the doctrine of hell is the idea of religious exclusivity: as Christians, we believe that the only way to be saved is through conscious faith in Jesus. This is, … Read More »

Comments (7)

The Doctrine of Hell: Apologetic Problems

Pin It

This is the second in a five-part series on the doctrine of hell. Click here for part one. For many people, the doctrine of hell presents an apologetic problem for Christians. Skeptics say that believing in hell is “morally reprehensible” and that the doctrine of hell makes God a “barbaric, moral monster, the worst … Read More »

Comments (3)

The Doctrine of Hell

Pin It

This is the first of a five-part series on the doctrine of hell. Concerning hell, C. S. Lewis once wrote, “There is no doctrine which I would more willingly remove from Christianity than this, if it lay in my power.”[1] In many ways, I agree with him. No one, Christians included, should like the … Read More »

Comments (17)