The Child of a Storm

Tonight (Sept 16, 2014) Dr. Gerald Smith presents the Drummond-Bush lecture for the L. Russ Bush Center for Faith and Culture. The event will be held at the Wake Forest Baptist Church, which is located on the campus of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. The title of his lecture is “‘The Child of a Storm:’ The Civil Rights Act of 1964.” Dr. Smith is the Martin Luther King scholar-in-residence at the University of Kentucky.

Dr. Gerald Smith

Dr. Gerald Smith

Dr. Smith’s Tuesday night lecture is part of a two-day reflection on the role that people of faith played in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Tomorrow (Wednesday) at 10 am in Binkley Chapel, Dr. Danny Akin will lead a panel discussion in a special “Casual Conversations” chapel. Dr. Smith will be joined by civil rights historians Dr. David Roach (of Baptist Press) and Dr. Brent Aucoin (of Southeastern Seminary). Rounding out the panel will be Mr. Clarence Henderson, who in 1960 participated in the sit-in of the whites-only Woolworth diner in Greensboro, NC. (NPR has an excellent article about importance of the sit-in and Clarence Henderson’s role can be found here: “The Woolworth Sit-In That Launched a Movement”). Make plans to join us!

Race in America 50 Years Later (Brent Aucoin)

[Editor's Note: Dr. Brent Aucoin is Associate Professor of History and Associate Dean of the College at Southeastern. His published doctoral dissertation (completed at the University of Arkansas) is entitled, A Rift in the Clouds: Race and the Southern Federal Judiciary, 1901–1910. He continues to research race relations in America. So we asked him to evaluate where we are now 50 years after the 1964 Civil Rights Act. See below for more resources on race relations upcoming at Southeastern.] 

When Barack Obama was elected President of the United States in 2008 and Fred Luter was elected President of the Southern Baptist Convention in 2012, some predicted that the elevation of these two black men to their respective offices would help solve the racial problems in America and America’s largest Protestant denomination. In the case of President Obama’s election, some prognosticators even began speaking of the advent of a “post-racial America.”   However, events such as the arrest of Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., the killing of Trayvon Martin, and the recent upheaval in Ferguson, Missouri, make it clear that racial strife continues in America. Likewise, the Southern Baptist Convention continues to struggle with an image tarnished by its pro-slavery origins and the fact that it remains a predominately white denomination. While it is safe to say that some individuals expected too much from the elections of Obama and Luter (particularly the former), it is also safe to conclude that those expectations, and the extraordinary attention given to their elections, indicate that the issue of race continues to be an important and pressing topic in America and in the church.

It is for this reason that I believe Americans and Southern Baptists in particular must take time to learn about and to reflect upon the history of race relations in our country and denomination. As a society and as a church we are grappling with the issue of race. This has been the case since the founding of both the USA and the SBC. America and American Christianity have been on a long and arduous journey when it comes to the matter of the relationship between black and white. If one wants to know where we are now in this journey and how we can move forward, then one needs to know how we have gotten to this point, and what is the ultimate goal.

America’s observation of the 50th anniversary of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act provides the perfect opportunity for us to do these very things. The passage of this monumental piece of legislation half a century ago has been dubbed as something just short of miraculous, considering its historical context. In a single moment racist practices and laws, which in some cases had plagued African Americans for nearly three centuries, were upended. The Act sought to transform America from a color-conscious society to one that is blind to race. The Act outlawed racial discrimination in employment, access to public accommodations, and education. Like the unprecedented, historic elections of Presidents Obama and Luter, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was a momentous milestone in the history of American race relations.

However, like the elections of Obama and Luter, the Civil Rights Acts also failed to solve all of the racial problems that many hoped and expected it would. (See, again, the recent turmoil in Ferguson, Missouri as an example of that failure.) It, like other milestones, marked a significant turning point in American race relations, and the taking of another step closer to the ultimate goal of racial reconciliation. But how close are we to that goal? How far along have we come in the journey? We know we are not there yet, but are we close, and what needs to be done to bring the journey to a successful end?

During a two-day event being put on by the Center for Faith and Culture called “Christian Reflections on the 50th Anniversary of the Passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act,” these questions and others will be explored and discussed. On the evening of Tuesday, September 16th, Dr. Gerald Smith will consider the role that Christianity played in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s and how Christians can guide the ongoing quest for racial justice and reconciliation. On Wednesday, September 17th a panel consisting of scholars and a veteran of the civil rights movement will examine the history of race relations in America from the 1960s to the present. This Casual Conversation event will begin at 10:00 AM and be held in Binkley Chapel.

For information on these events please check out this link. And if you have questions you’d like to ask Southeastern’s Casual Conversation’s panel please submit them here: https://sebts.typeform.com/to/iF5AXv. Join the conversation on Twitter at #Secasconvo and on the livestream: http://www.sebts.edu/news-resources/livestream.aspx

 

Daniel Heimbach gives us a Manual for Defending Marriage against Radical Deconstruction

Why Not Same SexSEBTS Senior Professor of Christian Ethics Daniel Heimbach has recently published a unique book in the vast literature about same-sex marriage. Why Not Same-Sex Marriage: A Manual for Defending Marriage against Radical Deconstruction. Is a thorough and comprehensive treatment of the subject from an evangelical Christian viewpoint, but it is not written for an evangelical audience. Instead, it is written to persuade those who are “on the fence.”

The rapid rise of the same-sex marriage movement has left many Christians with the sense that there is something wrong with the arguments for homosexuality, but without the time or ability to research and articulate defenses for the arguments. Contributing to this, the broad and varied stream of arguments used to support normalization of homosexuality and same-sex marriage are being broadcast as an incessant barrage in an attempt to sweep away all opposition to same-sex marriage.

This book is offers a reasonable argument in the midst of many hostile and emotional appeals for redefining the basic social institution of marriage. Heimbach writes,

Truth is the first casualty in political contests where one or both sides rely chiefly on emotion, on making good impressions, and on grabbing favorable attention at all costs. When this occurs, contests degenerate into emotional rhetoric severed from objective reality. Opponents are blackened beyond recognition, and champions become larger than life. This book enters a fray in which both sides are passionate, but it does so clinging to objective reality while resisting mischaracterization and distortion. (xiii)

In support of this goal, Heimbach presents 101 arguments, with a paragraph length statement for each argument, for the redefinition of marriage. Heimbach then offers a page-long response to the argument posed in firm, but charitable terms. Next comes a single-sentence statement of the main objection to the argument. Finally, each section includes a representative bibliography of popular and academic sources that weigh-in on both sides of the argument.

Though many conservative and evangelical blogs have helped to explain some of the arguments and counter-arguments surrounding same-sex marriage, many of those responses answer only a few of the varied attacks against traditional marriage or, sometimes, they lack the charity and careful research to make them compelling and convincing to a hostile audience.

Heimbach’s book, Why Not Same-Sex Marriage, fills the void admirably. The main substance of the volume is a collection of gracious answers to 101 false arguments for redefining civil marriage. Each of the arguments has been categorized by its type and the book arranged to reflect that. Heimbach uses categories like “Arguments Regarding the Nature of Marriage,” “Arguments Regarding Society and Social Order,” “Arguments Regarding Constitutional Law,” and “Arguments Regarding God and Theology.” The book is designed to be a reference manual for engaging in cultural dialogue.

In the back of the book, Heimbach includes two testimonies of former homosexuals who renounced their same-sex sin as they sought to live holy lives patterned after biblical norms; they were not “cured” so much as they were redeemed from their sin. He also includes two scholarly essays that provide an academically robust treatment on some of the movements that seek to redefine marriage. Finally, the book closes with a list of resources and agencies that provide assistance and information to those with questions about homosexuality and same-sex marriage.

This book, as any argument on this topic, is easy to caricature. Opponents will tend to dismiss alternate viewpoints and malign the motivations of those who stand by the traditional understanding of gender complementarity in marriage. However, anyone who picks up this book and reads a few arguments will find that the reasoning is sound, the assumptions are stated, and both viewpoints are represented fairly. Heimbach has done his readers a favor by grabbing a “third rail” in the ongoing cultural discussion and attempting to fairly answer the arguments of those who would want marriage redefined. Why Not Same-Sex Marriage is a substantive and significant contribution to the ongoing cultural debate.