In Case You Missed It

At the Center for Great Commission Studies, Jim Dell shared about ministering to military families during the holidays.

When you think about Christmas and the holiday season, certain things tend to come to mind; presents, Jesus, time with friends and family, among other things. But some families will spend this season without their loved ones, I am referring to those families who have or had a loved one in the military.


In a post at The Gospel Coalition, Tony Merida argues that church planters are farmers, not rock stars.

Farmers are anything but rock stars. They get up early and work. They sow, plow, toil, and protect. In all of it, they beg God for rain.


That’s a good description of ministry. Ministry is glorious, but it’s not glamorous. Like farming, most of our work goes unseen; it demands attention and endurance. And at the end of the day, we’re desperate for God to give the growth (1 Cor. 3:7).


Often God does send rain, and those are rich and joyful seasons. Is there anything greater than seeing people come to faith, grow in holiness, and be equipped and deployed for ministry? Ministry is challenging, but by God’s grace it also can be joyful and rewarding. Like elsewhere in our Christian experience, it carries both sorrow and joy, pain and pleasure, trial and triumph.


When we see fruit, though, we must never go around boasting about what “we did.” (I’ve never seen a farmer “bragtweet” about the number of pumpkins he harvested.) No, our boast and joy must be in the Lord, who graciously uses us in his harvest field.


One of the highlights of the College at Southeastern curriculum is the History of Ideas program. In a recent post at his personal blog, Dr. Bruce Ashford highlighted one of the major assignments from this program.

One of the great joys of teaching at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary is the opportunity to teach History of Ideas at its undergraduate college, The College at Southeastern. Our college, led by noted author and philosopher James K. Dew, requires its undergraduate students to take four courses in the History of Ideas.


The first History of Ideas course is a lecture-style grand tour of the rise and development of “thought,” of the way certain ideas have shaped our world, especially in the West. We evaluate various ideas and ideologies in light of their logical coherence, empirical adequacy, and existential viability. But we also evaluate them from a distinctly Christian perspective, in light of Scripture and the Christian tradition.


At the Center for Great Commission Studies, Drs. Scott Hildreth and Greg Mathias shared some recommended reading for your holiday break.

Have a lot of extra time on your hands now that classes are complete? Looking for some last minute Christmas gifts? Want to find new resources to equip you for ministry? The Center for Great Commission Studies has shared what they’re reading currently and what is on their to-read lists. We’d like to share this with you and encourage you to check out these great resources!


Dr. Chuck Lawless shared ten thoughts at his personal blog to consider if your church is having a Christmas Eve service.

Just some quick thoughts to think about if your church is planning a Christmas Eve service this weekend…


In Case You Missed It

At The Intersect Project, Hannah Jayne Adkins shared a post discussing why Christians should care about the opioid epidemic.

The opioid epidemic may sound like an abstract or irrelevant topic to you. It’s something you hear on the evening news, but you never think deeply about it.


But I’ve seen the effects of drug addiction first-hand. In addition to studying counseling at Southeastern Seminary, I also serve as a registered nurse. And I have seen how opioid addiction impacts real people’s lives in devastating and destructive ways.


At the Center for Great Commission Studies, Anna Daub shared a second post about singleness during the holidays, this time discussing how singles should engage others around them.

The holidays usually mean a myriad of emotions for single Christians. Some singles look forward to this time because of the opportunity to be a part of all the festivities or because it means a trip home to welcoming arms and nostalgic Christmas traditions. But for other singles, the holidays can be a stinging reminder of what they don’t have- a family waiting for them to come home, a significant other playing in the snow with them, children expectantly setting up cookies and milk for Santa. For these singles, the Christmas season can accentuate unmet desires and initiate the ache of loneliness, the sting of envy, and the choking hold of bitterness.


At The Gospel Coalition, Trevin Wax discusses singing ‘Peace on Earth’ when our heart is heavy.

It’s Christmastime, so we’re singing these days about “peace on earth,” joining our voices with the angels who appeared to the shepherds.


But let’s face it: 2017 has been a hard year for “peace on earth.” We’ve seen wars and rumors of wars. We’ve watched earthquakes flatten towns, hurricanes destroy islands, fires consume neighborhoods, and floodwaters engulf a city. Last month brought news of a mass killing that took more than half of the people gathered for worship at First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas.


The bad news is everywhere. Terrorist attacks. Nuclear threats. Corruption in Washington. Racial tensions. Sexual assault and harassment and predation coming to light in Hollywood, in Washington, D.C., and (Lord have mercy!) in the church of Jesus Christ. It’s easy to look at the state of our world and say, “Peace on earth sounds so far away.”


In a series of posts at his blog, Dr. Bruce Ashford shared ‘How to Watch a Move (An Evangelical Guide).’

Recently, I composed a brief survey, asking my website readers to tell me what they like and dislike about my website, and what they’d want to talk about if they had some time to chat with me personally.


I gained valuable insights from the survey, one of which is that many of my readers want me to explore issues at the intersection of Christianity and popular culture. In response to this request, I offered a six-part series entitled, “How to Watch a Movie (An Evangelical Guide).”


In light of the interest readers showed in the series, and in response to readers’ requests to put all of the content in one place so that it can be shared, I offer the six links together.


Dr. Chuck Lawless recently shared a post discussing why “parking lot” church business meetings are seldom good.

Maybe you’ve seen it happen. A group of church leaders are striving to make an “official” decision, but the discussions move beyond the official discussion to the parking lot (or the hallways, or the local café, or the telephone). Here’s why those parking lot meetings are seldom good.