In Case You Missed It

1) Southeastern alum (M.Div.) and current pastor at Gateway Heights Church in Cleveland, Ohio, Cory Wilson writes about the evangelical expression of “A Biblical Vision of Marriage” at First Things.

2) Students must read: Southeastern VP of Institutional Advancement, Art Rainer, shares some good advice on how to avoid student loan debt.

3) Ed Stetzer provides helpful analysis of the growth of Pentecostalism while many other evangelical denominations are shrinking.

4) An illuminating testimonial and helpful argument from Al Mohler, President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, on sexual orientation and the gospel of Jesus Christ.

5) Our culture didn’t become secular overnight. Read Trevin Wax’s interview of James K. A. Smith to find out how Charles Taylor tells this story.

6) This one is a bit more dated, but still worth reading. At the New Republic, John Gray reviews Richard Dawkins’ auto-biography, An Appetite for WonderAtheism, it seems, is a religion.

 

J. D. Greear on Prayer and God’s Attributes

Every Thursday afternoon, we highlight the writing of J. D. Greear, Pastor of The Summit Church in Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina. Recently, J. D. wrote about two of God’s attributes that (should) inform and inspire our prayers. 

Here’s an excerpt:

If you truly saw God as the loving Father he is, wouldn’t that change how you pray? If for just a moment you could truly grasp the lengths he went to redeem you, the brutal torture he endured on your behalf, the depth of compassion he has in his heart for you . . . then you would cry out with the hymn writer, “What a friend we have in Jesus, all our sins and griefs to bear; what a privilege to carry everything to God in prayer!”

 

I stand in awe of God our Creator. I bow in reverence before our almighty, holy, glorious Ruler and Judge. But nothing thrills my heart more than the privilege of calling our God Father.

Read the full post here.

John Ewart on Decision, Discipline, Dependence, and Deliverance

I had the privilege of speaking to our alumni at the North Carolina Baptist State Convention meeting this week. It was a joy to see old friends and make new ones. Hats off to our alumni office and our staff for pulling together a great time together. In my talk, I turned to an Old Testament story found in 2 Samuel 23 to illustrate a few key characteristics of a leader in God’s service. I love this little passage and wanted to pass it along to you.

This chapter tells of King David’s mighty men. They were unusually strong and courageous soldiers. In verse 9, we discover Eleazar, son of Dodo. It is from his life we glean principles to strengthen us to become better leaders for the kingdom.

First, we learn the Principle of Decision. Eleazar did not simply wake up one morning and decide, “I believe I will be one of the king’s three mighty men today.” Decisions were made long before by him and by God in order to prepare him for this service. He had been created in a certain way, equipped and prepared physically, mentally and spiritually by God in order to be used by the king. He made decisions to prepare for this role as a general of generals.

If we want to be used by God we must decide now to serve our King and to prepare ourselves that we might be ready when the call to service comes. Preparation for battle must occur before the battle actually arises. We must be spiritual, physically and mentally prepared before the opportunity comes our way or we might fail or miss the chance to be used. Nate Saint, the missionary martyr, said his life changed when he came to grips with the fact that, “obedience is not a momentary option…it is a die cast decision made beforehand.”

Leadership development involves training for what opportunities and challenges the future may hold. Instead of reactively recruiting people for ministry, why would we not proactively be equipping people for ministry yet to come?

The second principle we learn in verse 9 is the Principle of Discipline. Eleazar stood with his king even when everyone else ran away. The idea of the Hebrew army withdrawing refers to them going up or ascending. As the enemy poured over one side of the valley the Israelites retreated up the other, leaving their king and Eleazar down in the middle!

People retreat for two reasons: misdirected fear and misdirected faith. We forget who God is and who we are and the difference between the two. We fear the wrong things and we believe and trust in the wrong things, or people.

Leaders must learn to stand with their King even when it is not popular, the enemy is attacking, and they are all alone. This is not easy. Leaders stand because they are disciplined. They are disciplined because the right decisions have been made beforehand. We need effective leaders showing others how this is done.

Principle number three is the Principle of Dependence found in verse 10. Eleazar did not wait until he was overwhelmed by the enemy. Instead, he went on the attack with the only weapon he had. He was absolutely dependent on his sword to be strong and to work properly. He swung that sword so long his hand cramped to the hilt. The word means to be joined, to be one. He was one with his sword.

That battle wasn’t the first time the general had ever used his weapon. He was likely a master swordsman. He was one of the three mighty men! He probably had trained many a man in swordsmanship. You see decisions had been made, preparation and experience had taken place to lead him to this discipline and dependence.

Have we became master swordsmen? Have we practiced and prepared, spent time training, so that when the moment came, we could stand with our King? Read Ephesians 6:17 and Hebrews 4:12 and ask yourself if you need a little sword drill today.

Our last principle is the Principle of Deliverance in verse 10. I cannot think of a greater testimony than to acknowledge that all the victory, all the honor and glory belong to and are caused by, the Lord. God delivered Eleazar that day. There is no way he should have survived. God saved him and brought glory to Himself. A godly leader has no problem proclaiming that God did it. In fact, isn’t that the entire goal?

I find the last part of the verse almost humorous if it were not so sad. After the battle was all over and all the hard work was done, here comes the Hebrew army crawling back over the hill to strip the dead. I know a lot of churches and leaders like that. They want to enjoy all the benefits but not all the effort. They settle for spiritual leftovers.

How about you? Are you settling? Or are you serving your King, standing your ground, drawing your sword, and celebrating His victory? Learn and live out the principles of Decision, Discipline, Dependence, and Deliverance. Teach them to someone else.