In Case You Missed It

At The Gospel Coalition, Trevin Wax shared an article discussing why his son does not have a smartphone. Trevin writes:

Our son wants a smartphone with an Instagram account. He’s 12. He’s in seventh grade. He wants to be able to text his friends, send pictures, and chat in the afternoons and evenings.

 

His mom and I say “no.”

 

Keelan Cook posted an article at The People’s Next Door discussing if we can love people on social media.

February 4, 2004 was a very significant day in the world.

 

It was the day that Facebook was created. Whether you love it or not, Facebook was a catalyst for the online “social media” movement. There are now 1.6 billion active users on Facebook, which is nearly one quarter of the world’s population. Along with Facebook, there are several other social media outlets that have massive followings as well. I say all of that to point out two obvious conclusions. First, literally billions of people have decided they want to connect with other people around the world via social media. Second, it shows that people want to be heard and engage in dialogue with the rest of the world (or at least the hundred people that follow them). But what should our dialogue look like?

 

At The Intersect Project Sam Morris shares three reasons why we should engage in political discussion on social media. Sam writes:

Politics are everywhere — especially our social media feeds. After eight months of fierce campaigning, we now are watching the political divide play out in real time on social media.

 

People are getting frustrated with what they see on social media. Some claim that they’re “quitting Facebook” or other social platforms (save for perhaps Instagram).

 

But don’t delete that Facebook account just yet.

 

Bruce Ashford shared a post at his personal blog discussing how we, our nation, and our churches should respond to Trump’s refugee ban.

One week into his presidency, Donald Trump fulfilled one of his campaign promises to ban immigration from countries compromised by terrorism. In an executive order signed on Friday, he banned all people from seven nations, refusing them entry for 90 days. Those nations are Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen.

 

In light of the uproar caused by the executive order, and especially the refusal of Syrian refugees, this article will address six questions. The first three are more theoretical, while the last three address tangible actions that can be taken by nations, churches, and individuals.

 

At the Center for Great Commission Studies, Chuck Lawless shared ten reasons we must connect our churches with cities. Dr. Lawless writes:

We are called to get the gospel to all peoples of the world (Matt. 28:18-20), and we will not do that if we shy away from the world’s cities. Please read on, and pray about how your church might tackle a city – then encourage others to read this post as well.

Exploring Hope Podcast: Why Does the History of Ideas Matter for Us?

On this episode of the Exploring Hope Podcast, Dr. Dew sits down with Dr. John Wilsey to discuss the history of ideas. It may not immediately sound like the kind of topic that would be very interesting or applicable, but Dr. Wilsey, an expert in intellectual history, shows how fundamental history is to our faith. After all, we believe in a historical incarnation, death, and resurrection that the whole flow of human history centers on. So, our study and understanding of history shouldn’t be just an afterthought or even a hobby; it should shape us and guide us. Dr. Wilsey points to individuals such as Alexis de Tocqueville and others who have so much to teach us about culture and faith.

 

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Exploring Hope: What Happens When Culture Gets Confused with Christianity?

The true message of the gospel can sometimes get confused by those who claim to be Christians. Unfortunately, there is often a difference between the Christianity found in the Bible, and the “Christianity” which is lived out in our culture. In the video below, Dr. Jamie Dew sits down with Dr. Derek Hicks to discuss the disconnect which can be observed in history, as well as how much it inhabits our current culture.