Archives for tag: Bruce Ashford

A Letter From the President: Reflections On Ten Wonderful Years

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On January 15th of this year I celebrated my 10th year at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.  For Charlotte and me, this is almost impossible to believe!  And yet at the same time, we have experienced so many things.  As I pen this letter from Istanbul, Turkey, where we have the … Read More »

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On Evangelicals and Race: Two Recommendations

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Yesterday, my fellow contributor Bruce Ashford published an important blog post titled “On Affirmative Action and ‘Wishing You Were Black.’” Bruce accurately points out what I’m just beginning to learn: it is difficult for caucasians to understand exactly how minorities view racism because our position of cultural privilege so informs … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: Hoping that the March On Washington Finally Reaches the Church

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A recent edition of The Chronicle Review caused me to pause and reflect on the progress the United States has made, in terms of racial unity, but also on the long way we have to go. More particularly, it caused me to reflect upon how far we, God’s church in … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: Diane Johnson on Scientology

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Scientology is one of the most significant new religions in the world. Poor world. Or, so says Diane Johnson, in a recent edition of the New York Review of Books. Johnson reviews Lawrence Wright’s recent book on Scientiology, Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief (Knopf). She remarks … Read More »

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Building God-Centered Universities: A Call for Transdisciplinarity in Christian Higher Education

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Several weeks ago, I had the privilege of participating in a consultation on “Transdisciplinary Scholarship” sponsored by the Paideia Centre for Public Theology in Ontario, Canada. The meeting lasted for two days and was populated by thirteen scholars or public figures including Craig Bartholomew, R. R. Reno, Hunter Baker, Claudia … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: Was Hitler Ill?

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Was Hitler ill? You bet he was, but not in any sense that would exonerate him or make him less responsible for his actions. In a recent edition of London Review of Books, Richard J. Evans reviews Was Hitler Ill? by Hans-Joachim Neumann and Henrik Eberle.[1] Neumann and Eberle survey … Read More »

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Book Notice: “Adoniram Judson: A Bicentennial Appreciation of The Pioneer American Missionary”

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This year marks the bicentennial anniversary for Adoiram and Ann Judson’s departure from America to Burma (now Myanmar). For this reason Jason Duesing has presented the world with an edited volume, Adoniram Judson: A Bicentennial Appreciation of The Pioneer American Missionary (B&H, 2012). In this volume, Duesing reflects upon the … Read More »

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Global Context Series: 20 (or So) Books for the Globally-Minded Christian to Buy (and Read)

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Over the past few years, we have posted approximately twenty installments in the “Global Context Series.” In this series, we posted notices or reviews about books that help Christians get to know the global scene as a whole, or a particular region or country in particular. We want to reissue … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: On David Cooper, Roger Scruton, and Green Philosophy

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For those of our readers not yet acquainted with Roger Scruton, allow me to serve advance notice: Dr. Scruton is not a pony-tailed tree-hugger seeking to lead the world into an embrace of yoga mats and tofu wraps. He is politically conservative writer and philosopher whose work is unfailingly stimulating, … Read More »

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Briefly Noted: Briggle and Frodeman on The Problem with Philosophy

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Now these two fellows have gone to meddlin’. In their recent article in The Chronicle Review, Adam Briggle and Robert Frodeman argue American philosophy departments are out of touch with reality, and will soon be out of business, if they cannot foster an environment in which philosophers can be generalists … Read More »

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