Book Notice: “Adoniram Judson: A Bicentennial Appreciation of The Pioneer American Missionary”

This year marks the bicentennial anniversary for Adoiram and Ann Judson’s departure from America to Burma (now Myanmar). For this reason Jason Duesing has presented the world with an edited volume, Adoniram Judson: A Bicentennial Appreciation of The Pioneer American Missionary (B&H, 2012). In this volume, Duesing reflects upon the significance of Judson’s life and ministry and holds hope that the Baptist and evangelical world will continue in Judson’s tradition. The structure of the book, included below, guides the reader through learning from Judson and inspires one to follow Judson’s lead in living a life fully devoted to Jesus Christ. Included among the contributors to this volume are SEBTS’ very own President, Danny Akin, and brilliant historian Nathan A. Finn.

Here is the outline of the book:

Introduction – “From Judson’s Prison to the Ends of the Earth” by Paige Patterson

Historical Foundation

Chapter 1 – “Just Before Judson: The Significance of William Carey’s Life, Thought, and Ministry” by Michael A.G. Haykin

Chapter 2 – “New England’s New Divinity and the Age of Judson’s Preparation” by Robert Caldwell

Biographical Presentation

Chapter 3 – “Ambition Overthrown: The Conversion, Consecration, and Commission of Adoniram Judson, 1788–1812” by Jason G. Duesing

Chapter 4 – “‘Until All Burma Worships the Eternal God’: Adoniram Judson, the Missionary, 1812–50” by Nathan A. Finn

Chapter 5 – “So That The World May Know: The Legacy of Adoniram Judson’s Wives” by Candi Finch

Missiological and Theological Evaluation

Chapter 6 – “The Enduring Legacy of Adoniram Judson’s Missiological Precepts and Practices” by Keith E. Eitel

Chapter 7 – “From Congregationalist to Baptist: Judson and Baptism” by Gregory A. Wills

Homiletical Interpretation

Chapter 8 – “Marked for Death, Messengers of Life: Adoniram and Ann Judson” by Daniel L. Akin

Conclusion – “Please Come and Dig” by Jason G. Duesing

In my endorsement for the book, I wrote “Jason Duesing’s Adoniram Judson is a book of historical, theological, missiological, and pastoral consequence. The all-star ensemble of authors for this edited volume provides essays that appreciate Judson’s monumental life and work, but do so in an appropriately critical manner, avoiding the hagiography often present in missionary biographies. In this book, the reader is provided with an excellent and concise biographical treatment of Judson in historical context, followed by a theological and missiological evaluation of his life and ministry, and finally concluding with a homiletical interpretation of Judson. I highly recommend this book.” I stick with the endorsement, and add to it an encouragement for our readers to buy the book, read it, and allow the lessons from Judson’s life to instruct and encourage.

Global Context Series: 20 (or So) Books for the Globally-Minded Christian to Buy (and Read)

Over the past few years, we have posted approximately twenty installments in the “Global Context Series.” In this series, we posted notices or reviews about books that help Christians get to know the global scene as a whole, or a particular region or country in particular. We want to reissue this series in a single post so that you can perhaps find the right book for the area and people of the world that most interests you. The links below follow the titles of the original posts in the series.

The books are not necessarily the best books available on a particular subject, but they are among the best books that I have read on that subject. I try to tell you a little bit about the author, the style of the book, its readability, and of course a little bit about its content. I hope that you will find this series helpful. I hope you will enjoy the books, and will find them to be a stimulus to love God as you learn about, and learn to love, the people in God’s world.

Preface

International:

“The Clash of Civilizations”

“The World is Flat 3.0”

“Hot, Flat, and Crowded?”

“A New Christendom With New Faces”

“The Post American World”

Africa:

“An Obsession with Power and Control”

Central Asia:

“The Ayatollah Begs to Differ”

“The Great Game”

“The Ayatollah’s Democracy”

Central Asia / Afghanistan:

“The Kite Runner”

“A Thousand Splendid Suns”

“Ghost Wars”

East Asia / China:

“Chinese Lessons”

“Out of Mao’s Shadow”

Europe:

“Europe, Islam, and Christianity”

“The Penguin History of Europe”

Europe / Russia:

“Stalin’s Children”

North Africa / Middle East:

“How Conflicts Within Islam Will Shape the Future of the Globe”

“The Crisis of Islam”

“The Arabs in History”

South Asia:

“Freedom at Midnight”

“On India, Calvinists, and Cow Dung Shampoo”

“The Reluctant Fundamentalist”Download java games

Briefly Noted: On David Cooper, Roger Scruton, and Green Philosophy

For those of our readers not yet acquainted with Roger Scruton, allow me to serve advance notice: Dr. Scruton is not a pony-tailed tree-hugger seeking to lead the world into an embrace of yoga mats and tofu wraps. He is politically conservative writer and philosopher whose work is unfailingly stimulating, and whose recent book, Green Philosophy calls for a conservative environmentalism. Scruton’s book is reviewed by David E. Cooper in a recent edition of the Times Literary Supplement (March 2, 2012).[1] Cooper interacts with Scruton’s proposal, which puts political realism, reason, and care for one’s home at the center of its environmental care paradigm.

Al Gore once called for “rescue of the environment [to be] the organizing principle of civilization.” Cooper states, “Scruton’s response to this call is that the real ‘natural bedfellow’ of environmentalism is conservativism, for ‘conservativism and conservation are two aspects of a single long-term policy.’” (10) By chronicling the failures of non-government organization, the EU, and the US Environmental Protection Agency, Scruton argues these organizations display a “total lack of realism” on what works in caring for the environment. Scruton wants a more rational, realistic approach to the environment than those associated with traditional environmental (i.e., liberal) policies.

Hence, Scruton’s thesis is that “environmental protection comes from the Oikophilia of people.” “Oikophilia is Scruton’s coined term for “a family of motives at whose centre is love of one’s home.” Environmentalism often fails in its futile call for one to love everyone and every place, even the whole planet. Scruton’s “oikophilia, however, is a sympathy and concern for those who handed down to us the home we love and those to whom, in turn, we shall hand it down.” Basically, the more one cares for his/her home and passes that care and concern on to others, the better the community will care for the environment. This proposal, Scruton believes, is more realistic than traditional (liberal) environmentalism. The question Cooper asks, however, is can this realism called “oikophilia” actually be a realistic answer for caring for the environment? (see p. 11)

Scruton’s proposal is more compelling and reasonable than its liberal competitors, and yet it falls short precisely because it does not take its starting point, trajectory, and parameters from God’s revelation in Christian Scripture. In order to build a robust framework for environmental/ecological ethics, one must take into account at least four Christian doctrines. These four doctrines are in fact the four plot movements of the biblical narrative—creation, fall, redemption, and restoration. These doctrines are central to the Christian faith and indeed can be seen as the four major plot movements in the Christian narrative.[2]

The first movement is Creation, in which we find a created world shaped and formed by the uncreated Triune God; further, it is a good world that God has filled with his image bearers, who are to be stewards of it. If God’s world is good, we ought not to trash it. If God created the world so that we could flourish with it in mutual interdependence, then we should not consciously do anything to harm that. The second movement is the Fall, in which God’s image bearers rebelled against him, alienating themselves from him, each other, and the entire created order. As a result, God’s good and beautiful creation was marred by the ugliness of sin, sin which has deeper and more pervasive consequences than we might typically imagine. Our relationship to the cosmos is no longer one of perfect mutual interdependence. The third movement is Redemption, in which God speaks of One through whom he will redeem his image-bearers and indeed the whole creation. The entirety of the biblical drama points to this One, the Messiah, and the salvation that he will accomplish. We are told that he will redeem not only his image bearers but also the entire cosmos. This brings us to the fourth and final movement, Restoration, in which God restores his good creation. He establishes a new heavens and earth, inhabited by his image-bearers redeemed from among every tribe, language, and nation, who will dwell eternally with him. At this time, we will again flourish and live in perfect harmony on a renewed cosmos, in the glory of God himself.

This narrative provides the framework for a Christian theology of ecological stewardship. Without this framework, humans tend to either enthrone or denigrate the cosmos. In the United States, many political liberals tend to enthrone the cosmos, even creating an alternative soteriology and eschatology with Mother Earth at the center. On the other hand, many political conservatives tend to denigrate the cosmos, mocking any ecological or environmental initiatives. But both of these tendencies are wrong. We are not to worship the cosmos, on the one hand, or trash it, on the other. The cosmos is not ultimate, but neither is it to be denigrated. It is not God, but it is God’s good creation. For this reason, we are to be loving stewards of God’s good creation, looking backwards to God’s creational design and forward to the restored cosmos on which we will dwell eternally and in which we will experience eternal shalom.

For a more extensive essay on a Christian view of the environment, see “Creation Care Founded on the Biblical Narrative (Creation, Fall, Redemption, Restoration).”


[1] David E. Cooper, “With Nature,” in Times Literary Supplement (March 2, 2012): 10–11; Roger Scruton, Green Philosophy: How to Think Seriously About the Planet (Atlantic Books, 2011).

[2] More than a few recent theological proposals have argued that Scripture contains one basic and overarching narrative within which Christian doctrine finds its home. These proposals are written by a diverse array of scholars, including theologians N. T. Wright, Kevin Vanhoozer, and Michael Goheen, philosophers Albert Wolters and Craig Bartholomew, and biblical scholar Christopher Wright. However, this essay differs from those theologians in two respects. First, whereas Wolters tells the story in terms of three acts, Wright in terms of five acts, and Goheen/Bartholomew in terms of six, this essay sees four acts: creation, fall, redemption, restoration. See N. T. Wright, The New Testament and the People of God (London: SPCK, 1992), 139-43; Kevin Vanhoozer, The Drama of Doctrine (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2005); Craig G. Bartholomew and Michael W. Goheen, The Drama of Scripture (Grand Rapids: Baker, 2004); Albert M. Wolters, Creation Regained (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2005); Christopher J. H. Wright, The Mission of God (Downers Grove: IVP, 2006). Second, of the authors above, only Christopher Wright makes extended application to ecological matters.