In Case You Missed It

In a recent post at Facts and Trends, Aaron Earls discussed the ten worst countries for Christians in 2017. Aaron writes:

For the 16th consecutive year, North Korea tops the list of the most oppressive nations toward Christians.

Open Doors, a Christian persecution awareness ministry, published its annual World Watch List, highlighting the plight of Christians around the world who are arrested, harassed, tortured, and killed for their faith.

 

Dr. Bruce Ashford published an article at his personal blog which shares twelve important books about intellectual history and the Western mind.

Here are twelve books I recommend to persons who wish to better understand the rise and development of Western thought. Together, the books form a sort of “starter” course. I will describe each book and then rank its level of difficulty on a scale of 1-5, with 5 being the most difficult. Level 1 is the category for a book you could give to any friend or family member. Level 5 is the category for a book that might be required in a PhD seminar.

 

In a recent blog post, Eric Geiger shared three indicators you might love ministry more than God. Dr. Geiger writes:

Ministry is thrilling. Yes, there are deep and painful challenges, but we get to see the Lord change people’s lives. Ministry allows us to enjoy a front row seat to people grasping the gospel, to people being sent out on mission, and to the beauty of Christian community. Yes, there are plenty of people who throw stones and criticism, but there are also God’s people who offer encouragement and prayers and support to those who lead and serve. Because ministry is thrilling, it can be addictive. Because affirmations exist, we can long for more and more of them. We can, if we are not careful, love ministry more than the God who equipped us for it. If you love ministry more than God, these three things are true in your heart.

 

At The Center for Great Commission Studies, Dr. Scott Hildreth shared about the little things that make the biggest differences.

Over the years I have worked with missionaries, church staff, and students. These men and women have had passion in their hearts and a vision to changing the world for Christ. They launch into a ministry. Soon they are frustrated and ready to give up. They do not see the fruit or success they hoped for. They suffer from burnout or their family suffers because of an unhealthy work/ministry pace. The back half of this proverb quoted above contains some important tips for successful ministry/missionary life.

 

Trevin Wax posted at The Gospel Coalition discussing why Christians should care about ideas.

I can’t forget the shoes. Piles and piles of them filling the room. Of all the gruesome images I saw at the Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., the room filled with shoes from Jewish victims is the one thing I can’t forget. I think about the people who once owned those shoes, and I mourn the human lives lost in a vortex of unspeakable evil.

The tragedy of the Holocaust reminds me of something I heard as a high school student—ideas have consequences. Adolf Hitler did not come out of nowhere. Before there was the Holocaust, there were decades of philosophical theories advocating superior races, nationalistic laws, and the use of eugenics to weed out inferior peoples. Throw in a dash of “survival of the fittest” from Darwinism and perhaps the pursuit of raw power from Nihilism and eventually we arrive in the concentration camp—a horrifying concoction of various falsehoods.

Ideas do indeed have consequences. But sometimes those consequences are beautiful, as in the early days of Christianity when plagues would sweep through cities in the Roman Empire. While many Roman citizens chose to abandon family and friends and flee the city to escape contamination, early Christians stayed behind to nurse the sick. Because of their belief in a Savior who sacrificed himself for others, they were content to give their lives as well.

 

In a post at his personal blog, Dr. Danny Akin shared six ways preaching aids discipleship in the church. Dr. Akin writes:

Discipleship lies at the heart of the Great Commission, so it should be at the heart of all our ministry as well, including our preaching. Many churches struggle to disciple their people, but I want to suggest that the preaching ministry of the church can and should be one of the main engines of discipleship for the entire body. Here are six ways I believe faithful biblical exposition can help Christians grow to look more like the Lord Jesus and live well before Him.

In Case You Missed It

Earlier this week at his blog, Dr. Danny Akin shared about preaching books for the beginning expositor. Dr. Akin writes:

Recently I was asked a question about a textbook that would help prepare and deliver expository sermons. No one hates self-promotion more than I! Having said that, for the beginner in this high and holy calling, I would commend Engaging Exposition written by myself, Bill Curtis and Stephen Rummage.

 

Dr. Bruce Ashford published an article this week discussing an evangelical response to fake news, cynicism, and “PC” conformity.

The past year in American politics has put on full display the social, cultural, and political breakdown we are experiencing in the United States. Evangelicals, we need to find a way to make things right again, and we can’t count on talk show hosts or politicians to do this. It’s up to us—ordinary citizens of the United States—to help restore the health of our nation, and we should start by doing three things.

 

At The Center for Great Commission Studies, Dr. George Robinson wrote discussing how our curriculum alone will not make disciples.

Henry Blackaby. Beth Moore. “Explore the Bible”. “The Gospel Project”.  I’m thankful to God for them all.  Blackaby’s “Experiencing God” helped me to understand that as a Christian I needed to “Find where God is at work and join Him.”  Moore taught my wife that her identity is in Christ through a myriad of her Bible studies.  Both “Explore the Bible” and “The Gospel Project” are Sunday School/Small Group curricula put out by Lifeway Christian Resources helping literally millions of Christians to faithfully interpret the Bible and to grow in their relationship to God.   Most of them are good! But none of these curricula are effective (or even intended) at making reproducing disciples – at least not on their own.  Why?  Because curricula don’t make disciples.

 

At his blog The Wardrobe Door, Aaron Earls discussed two questions every Christian must answer. Aaron writes:

Every generation of believers faces their own unique set of challenges and questions. Different temptations hold cultural sway and attempt to pull Christians off course in different eras.

 

Yet, as the writer of Ecclesiastes said, “There is nothing new under the sun.” These challenges, questions and temptations have been around before—in different forms and different combinations, yes, but we do not face unknown riddles.

 

Today, many Christians are stumbling over how we respond to an unchanging Scripture and a changing world. With that, there are two distinct temptations those of us who are following Jesus today must face.

 

How we respond to these two questions will determine our faithfulness in this generation.

 

Chris Martin posted this week with three reasons we should not use social media.

My job is to help authors leverage blogs and social media to use the gifts God has given them to serve the Church in her mission of making disciples.

 

But man, I really wish social media would just disappear sometimes. Don’t you?

 

Usually, the times I wish social media would disappear come about when I see Christians behaving badly on social media in such a way that it makes Jesus or the Church look bad.

 

I tend to think everyone should be on social media (and that everyone should have a blog). I think this because I think God has gifted everyone with unique insights and abilities that, if shared, may be used for the building up of the body of Christ.

 

But, sometimes it’s smart to keep yourself off of social media. Some of us are prone to certain sinful attitudes or postures that may make social media more harmful than helpful for us. Sometimes it’s smart to avoid social media altogether. Here are three reasons you should NOT use social media.

 

This was a great week in Chapel at Southeastern. We were blessed with powerful sermons from two members of our faculty: Dr. Chuck Quarles and Dr. Steven Wade. Be sure to check out the videos below if you missed them earlier in the week.

Dr. Chuck Quarles, The Sound of Silence: Ezekiel 33:1-11

 

 

Dr. Steven Wade, While We Wait: Titus 2:11-14