In Case You Missed It

In a post at The Intersect Project, Christy Britton shared five ways to help the poor without hurting them.

When I boarded my jet for Kenya in 2015, I couldn’t wait to arrive at the Nairobi slums and get busy. Many people there needed help. I was prepared to visit, assess the needs and figure out what I could do. The need was overwhelming, but I’m a fixer — and I was armed and ready to fix.

 

At The Gospel Coalition, Trevin Wax considered why it takes an eclipse to get us to look up to the heavens.

Middle Tennessee is in the eclipse zone. On August 21, my city will be inundated with people traveling from thousands of miles to witness a total eclipse, a rare event in which the moon obstructs the sun for several minutes. On videos of a total eclipse from other parts of the world, people cheer and clap when the moment occurs. It’s as if everyone is overcome by artistry of the Creator and feels the need to join in nature’s applause.

 

I’m going to watch the eclipse. I won’t try to capture it on film or on my phone because I want to enjoy the rarity of the moment for what it is. This will not happen again in my hometown in my lifetime, and I don’t want to see it through my camera. (I’m just praying it doesn’t rain!)

 

I will stop and pause for the eclipse. But this makes me wonder: Why don’t I do this more often? Am I as attuned as I should be to the glories that surround me all the time?

 

Dr. Joe McKeever shared a post at his personal blog discussing what he would do if he were starting ministry again.

If I were a young man just beginning to minister for the Lord, I would want to make sure I did these things…

 

At his personal blog, Art Rainer shared three ways Millennials can miss a huge but vanishing opportunity for their retirement savings.

Millennials have a huge opportunity right now for their retirement savings. They have what many Baby Boomers now want.

What is it? Time.

 

Late last Friday night, a group of white nationalists and white supremacists marched through Charlottesville, Virginia setting off a ripple of events that is still spreading. Much has been written about these events, and at Between the Times, we wanted to share a few links from members of the Southeastern family.

 

Today in chapel at the Fall 2017 Convocation message at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, our president, Dr. Danny Akin shared the Southeastern Seminary stance on Racial Diversity.

Dr Akin’s remarks included the following quote:

We stand steadfastly against any type of evil or wickedness that exalts any type of racial superiority, white supremacy, neo-Nazis, bigots, and racists. We will mark that for what it is: sin, evil and wickedness; and we will never divert from the clear affirmation of the Bible that we as believers in Christ all have the same Father, we are indwelt by the same Savior, and we also are empowered by the same Holy Spirit of God. That is who we are! And, I recognize that for a denomination that still bears the stain of racism, we have work to be done. But, by God’s grace and for His glory, we will join hands together and we will plot out a different course and we will create a different community that we pray that God then will seem to bless and that God will multiply many, many times over.

 

 

In Case You Missed It

At  the International Mission Board, Phil Bartuska shared four ways missionaries can leave well for the field.

For those planning to go overseas as missionaries, there will come a day when they and their families board a plane with one-way tickets in hand. They’ll be nervous but confident that God is making a way for them to take the gospel to the unreached.

 

Every missionary has this experience in common. Whether single or married with children, this experience bonds all missionaries together. They have left behind family, friends, jobs, security, comfort, and normalcy for the sake of the gospel among the unreached. I have been thinking about that moment for years, and soon, my family and I will be stepping onto that plane.

 

Having said that, there is a lot to do here before we get to our destination. You see, we pray, plan, and prepare for the time when we land, but if we are only thinking of our future ministry, we may be missing some key opportunities to point our family and friends to Christ. The truth of the gospel should impact the way we leave home. Here are four things you can do to both leave well and prepare for your future ministry overseas.

 

Marty Duren posted an article at the Lifeway Pastors blog discussing mentoring relationships that make sense.

Over the last decade or so the concept of mentoring has taken a deep hold in leadership theory, including the church. The idea is leaders need someone with more experience than they to provide insight and counsel. In a perfect world, one’s mentor would prepare you for each and every eventuality you could face. We all know this is not probable.

 

As an older-teen and young man, my primary mentor was a truck-driver and deacon named Al Autry. When Al died, his funeral was attended by dozens of men my age and younger, all of whom counted Al as a primary mentor—if not the primary mentor—in their younger days. Al mentored me spiritually during a time when my own father was not yet a follower of Jesus.

 

In my early ministry, I didn’t need to talk to Bill Hybels, Rick Warren, or John Piper. But I did need to talk to someone who had more pastoral experience than I did. Two of my former pastors, an denominational employee, and a couple of pastors in my new locale fit that bill. While only one of them would I consider a mentor in the traditional sense, all of them filled the role in the aggregate.

 

When I moved to serve on a church staff, all the other staff members had more experience that I did, and at churches requiring greater responsibility. Every staff meeting was a mentoring session as was ministry together.

 

As I’ve grown older in ministry, younger pastors sometimes ask if I can mentor them, even if for a limited period of time. These relationships are always a blessing. But, there are mistakes pastors make when seeking a mentor. Three such mistakes are 1) thinking your mentor has to be a celebrity pastor, 2) that mentoring is always one person teaching the other, and 3) that only young pastors need mentors.

 

Not. True.

 

At the Intersect Project, Nathaniel Williams discussed embracing a smartphone-free life.

I sat around a table with a group of fellow pastors, many of whom were older than me. As our meeting concluded, one of the men planned how he would follow up with us.

 

“Does everyone have a smartphone?” he asked. The others nodded in agreement; some of them had been taking notes on their phones as he spoke.

 

I sheepishly shook my head no. I pulled out my circa-2007 basic phone and waved it in the air.

 

“How is it that the youngest person here doesn’t have a smartphone?” he asked. I laughed, admitted that I was behind the times and shared my email address instead.

 

I am used to these surprised reactions. I get them all the time. I am one of a dying breed — a millennial without a smartphone. Since more than 97 percent of my peers use a smartphone, people like me are almost extinct.

 

To be clear, my reasons for not having a smartphone aren’t remarkable. I’m not engaged in some anti-technology crusade. (I manage a website.) Nor am I interested in getting off the grid. (I still use my basic cell phone for calls and texts.) My tardiness in adopting a smartphone involves a combination of budget, stubbornness and the fact that I get along fine without one.

 

In this piece, I won’t try to convince you to become a smartphone curmudgeon. I simply want to offer a portrait of what it’s like to carry a technological relic in my pocket. To be 10 years behind the trend. To be a millennial without a smartphone.

 

At his personal blog, Southeastern President, Dr. Danny Akin shared why we need to stop and listen when it comes to Kingdom Diversity in the SBC.

I’ve been a Southern Baptist for as long as I have been a Christian. I came to know Jesus in a Southern Baptist church. I was baptized in a Southern Baptist church. I was called to ministry in a Southern Baptist church. I was educated at Southern Baptist institutions, and I have given my life to helping others on their path to ministry. In good times and bad, I love the SBC and I thank our Lord for its investment in my life.

 

When I read Lawrence Ware’s New York Times article after the 2017 SBC Annual Meeting, I was grieved. I don’t know Mr. Ware, and he and I don’t see eye to eye on every issue, particularly some of the parallels that he drew in his argument. But that didn’t change my reaction. When someone suggests that the experience of African Americans in my denomination is such that the best option may be to leave, I only feel sadness. I wish with all my heart this was not the case.

 

Chuck Lawless shared a post at his blog listing ten reasons Satan attacks families.

It’s no secret that Satan aims his arrows at families. In the Garden of Eden, he disrupted the marriage of Adam and Eve. In the very next chapter of the Bible, his influence was so great that a brother killed a brother. From that time, our homes have been in his sights. Here’s why.

New Book: Pastoral Theology

Pastoral Theology: Theological Foundations for Who a Pastor is and What He Does by Daniel L. Akin and R. Scott Pace, 336 pages, June 1, 2017

Image Source: B&H Academic

While many pastoral ministry books focus on the practical duties of the pastor, few works actually consider how theological truth defines the pastor’s role and responsibilities. These pragmatic ministry tools, though instructionally beneficial, essentially divorce biblical doctrine from ministerial practice. As a result, pastors’ lives and ministries often lack the theological roots that provide the stability and nourishment necessary to sustain them. Pastoral Theology constructs a theological framework for pastoral ministry that is biblically derived, historically informed, doctrinally sound, missionally engaged, and contextually relevant. By using traditional theological categories the authors explore the correlation between evangelical doctrine and pastoral practice. Through careful theological integration they formulate a ministry philosophy that defines the pastoral office and determines its corresponding responsibilities in light of theological truth. The authors provide a theological understanding of the pastorate that will equip aspiring pastors to discern and pursue their calling, challenge younger pastors to build on ministerial truth instead of ministerial trends, and inspire seasoned pastors to be reinvigorated in their passion for Christ and his church.

Dr. Danny Akin writes:

The pastoral task is inherently theological—it cannot be otherwise. But too often the theological foundations for this task have been assumed, rather than explored. What we’ve tried to do is provide a resource that can help equip churches, pastors, and training institutions to think well about the biblical and theological basis for pastoral ministry. We pray that this results in healthier pastors, healthier churches, and healthier followers of the Chief Shepherd, King Jesus.

Dr. Scott Pace writes:

Pastoral Theology seeks to establish the theological foundation for pastoral ministry. So many ministry books focus on the practical responsibilities of the pastor without ever exploring the biblical and theological impetus for performing them. Our hope is that Pastoral Theology will help pastors wed their theology with their ministry the way the Lord designed and desires it to be. By understanding the doctrinal roots that define the pastoral office, pastors will be able to more faithfully serve the church and fulfill their calling. Each chapter traces an orthodox doctrine from its theological genesis through its biblical foundation to its practical implications for pastoral ministry.

 

About the Authors:

Daniel L. Akin is the Ed Young Sr. Chair of Expository Preaching, Professor of Preaching & Theology, and President of Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, NC.

R. Scott Pace is the Rev. A. E. and Dora Hughes Chair of Christian Ministry, Associate Professor of Applied Ministry, and Chair of the Christian and Cross-Cultural Ministry Department at Oklahoma Baptist University in Shawnee, OK.