In Case You Missed It

1) Danny Akin reflected on his hopes, dreams, and efforts for reconciliation after watching “Selma.”

2) At SEND Network, Josh King describes the worthwhile difficulties of church revitalization.

3) Ed Stetzer interviews SEBTS prof and Pastor of Imago Dei Church Tony Merida about his new book, Ordinary.

4) From Think Theology, Andrew Wilson provides a good list of tips on proper (or loving) Twitter use.

5) At Public Discourse, the blog of the Witherspoon Institute, Katy Faust–daughter of a gay parent–writes an open letter to Supreme Court Justice Kennedy. She winsomely argues that the redefinition of marriage will, in fact, harm children.

Pray for Missionaries

Danny Akin is a pioneering, intrepid seminary president. As proof, the CGCS recently highlighted his efforts as an elephant rider while visiting SEBTS 2+2 students serving overseas. In this post, Greg Mathias offers some specific ways we can pray for these missionaries (and students) while they serve and learn. Here’s an excerpt:

This past month, we were in Thailand with 20+ family units, hence the elephant riding picture. After pulling these missionaries together, hearing their heart, their struggles and joys, we want to pass along some specific prayer requests from them. Surprisingly enough, missionaries are human beings and they need prayer for much of the same issues we face back here in the states: family, interpersonal conflict, stress, etc. Today, set aside some time and pray for these twenty families and others that stretch across the 10/40 window and beyond.

For the full post, and the pic of Dr. Akin on an elephant, click here.

Christ Is Sovereign Over All

The title for this post is drawn from a famous statement by the Dutch statesman and theologian Abraham Kuyper (1837-1920). The full statement reads: “There is not a square inch in a whole domain of our human existence over which Christ, who is Sovereign over all, does not cry, ‘Mine!’” Where did Kuyper get this idea? I suspect, at least in part, from the Great Commission text of Matthew 28:18-20 where Jesus said, “All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth.” What Jesus has authority over belongs to Him. What belongs to Him He rightly claims as “Mine!” All of creation is Christ’s. As we advance the gospel across North America and to the nations we reclaim souls and territory that belong to King Jesus. This world belongs to the Son of God, not Satan.

C.S. Lewis certainly understood this to be the nature of our assignment. He said, “There is no neutral ground in the universe. Every square inch, every split second, is claimed by God and counterclaimed by Satan.” Lewis was right. We are indeed locked in a cosmic conflict for the souls of human persons. Eternal destinies hang in the balance. We are also locked in a cultural conflict that will determine in many ways how we think and work, how we live and die.

I am in complete agreement with Francis Schaeffer, whose letters and papers are archived in our library at SEBTS. This wonderful Christian thinker, whose writings have had a profound influence on my life, put it like this: “Christianity provides a unified answer for the whole of life.” Did you catch the key word? The “whole” of life. In other words, our Christian faith is to translate into a Christian life, a way of thinking, acting, playing and living. No area is off limits. No discipline is out of bounds. Our surrender to Christ’s Lordship will impact the totality of our lives. It will shape and determine what we call our “worldview.”

Southeastern Seminary houses “The Center for Faith and Culture.” It is named after my former teacher and colleague L. Rush Bush, who served as the Dean of SEBTS for right at 20 years. The Center reflects well the heart and perspective of its founding director who believed all of life should be permeated by a Christian worldview. Bush said, “A worldview is that basic set of assumptions that gives meaning to ones thoughts. A worldview is that set of assumptions that someone has about the way things are, about what things are, about why things are.” Complementing this excellent statement, I often say a worldview is a comprehensive and all-encompassing view of life by which we think, understand, judge and act. It guides and determines our approach to life and how we will live.

Because the seminary I serve is committed to cultivating a comprehensive Christian worldview, we allow these ideas– axioms if you like–to inform how we teach in the classroom. It is also why we hold conferences that address issues like creation, abortion, sexual identity, adoption, marriage and family, government, economics, politics, law, philosophy, ethics, the environment, poverty and more. Faith and culture meet at the intersection of real life, and SEBTS is committed to being in the center of all of it!

Schaeffer says, “Christianity is the greatest intellectual system the mind of man has ever touched.” I believe that. And Kuyper adds, “When principles that run against your deepest convictions begin to win the day, then battle is your calling, and peace has become sin; you must, at any price of dearest peace, lay your convictions bare before friend and enemy, with all the fire of your faith.” We at Southeastern believe this too, and we indeed accept the call to battle, laying our convictions bare for friend and foe alike!

This post originally appeared on Sep. 22, 2014. online gameonline game mobile