Lessons from South Sudan

Recently, John Ewart traveled with Danny Akin and Scot Hildreth, director of the Center for Great Commission Studies, to the Uganda-Sudan border to meet with pastors and their wives from the South Sudan Baptist Convention. In the excerpt of his post below, John details the reasons for the meeting and the lessons learned from these persevering brothers and sisters.

As I write this post, I am sitting in front of a desk fan about the size of a grapefruit in the mid day heat of Uganda not far from the borders of both the Congo and South Sudan. I am here with our president, Danny Akin and Scott Hildreth, director of our Center for Great Commission Studies. We are leading a conference for pastors and their wives from the South Sudan Baptist Convention. It is difficult to describe what all these brothers and sisters in Christ have endured over the last years and especially the last few months.

 

Sudan and South Sudan have experienced civil wars that first pitted Muslims against Christians and more recently tribe against tribe. The most recent conflict broke out in South Sudan in December 2014 and saw two tribes with competing political aspirations fighting one another. This is an extremely simplistic summary of a very complex situation.

 

One very unfortunate result of this conflict has been the division of the church along tribal lines as well. We are here at the request of the South Sudan Baptist Convention and the IMB team to minister to and equip these leaders to go back into the church of South Sudan and bring unity and healing. It is obviously a great privilege for us. We are meeting in northern Uganda instead of South Sudan due to security issues because the tension between tribes is so intense and might spill over into our meeting.

Read the full post at the CGCS blog, here.

 

In Case You Missed It

1) Danny Akin reflected on his hopes, dreams, and efforts for reconciliation after watching “Selma.”

2) At SEND Network, Josh King describes the worthwhile difficulties of church revitalization.

3) Ed Stetzer interviews SEBTS prof and Pastor of Imago Dei Church Tony Merida about his new book, Ordinary.

4) From Think Theology, Andrew Wilson provides a good list of tips on proper (or loving) Twitter use.

5) At Public Discourse, the blog of the Witherspoon Institute, Katy Faust–daughter of a gay parent–writes an open letter to Supreme Court Justice Kennedy. She winsomely argues that the redefinition of marriage will, in fact, harm children.

Pray for Missionaries

Danny Akin is a pioneering, intrepid seminary president. As proof, the CGCS recently highlighted his efforts as an elephant rider while visiting SEBTS 2+2 students serving overseas. In this post, Greg Mathias offers some specific ways we can pray for these missionaries (and students) while they serve and learn. Here’s an excerpt:

This past month, we were in Thailand with 20+ family units, hence the elephant riding picture. After pulling these missionaries together, hearing their heart, their struggles and joys, we want to pass along some specific prayer requests from them. Surprisingly enough, missionaries are human beings and they need prayer for much of the same issues we face back here in the states: family, interpersonal conflict, stress, etc. Today, set aside some time and pray for these twenty families and others that stretch across the 10/40 window and beyond.

For the full post, and the pic of Dr. Akin on an elephant, click here.