Book Notice: “The Community of Jesus”

community-of-jesusChristopher Morgan has put forth a steady stream of top-shelf edited volumes in the field of systematic theology. These volumes work very nicely in theology and doctrine courses, whether the courses are introductory in nature or upper-level electives. Morgan’s volumes model how to take complex ideas and mediate them in a lucid and compelling manner to pastors, college students, and seminarians. Morgan’s most recent volume is no exception.

In The Community of Jesus: A Theology of the Church (B&H, 2013), which Morgan (California Baptist) edited together with Kendell Easley (Union University), the authors provide compelling and coherent answers to questions about the nature and practice of the church.

In the introduction, Morgan and Easley note their different experiences in and with the church and how these experiences have shaped their approach. They also point out the significance of the numerous questions that attend any discussion of church: what about Baptism; the Lord’s Supper; church discipline; the relationship to Israel; denominations? These questions, they note, are important but are “ . . . best seen through a broader, salvation historical lens the theology of the church framed by a context of the nature and mission of God.” (xiii)

Instead of seeking to answer all the questions they opt to lay a theological foundation upon which the reader can build a fuller exposition of the church. This in turn speaks to many of the more applied questions. “Our focus is to work toward a biblical, historical, systematic, missional theology of the church.” (xiii) That is, The Community of Jesus is an integrative theology of the church that paves the way for other volumes to answer myriad questions about context and application.

Readers of BtT will be familiar with the contributing scholars. In the first five chapters, Paul House, Kendell Easley, David Dockery, Ray Van Neste, and Southeastern’s own Andreas Köstenberger lay out the biblical teachings––from OT to NT––which inform an evangelical Baptist ecclesiology. In the next four chapters James Patterson, Steve Wellum, Chris Morgan, and your scribe relate the biblical teachings to church history, salvation history, God’s glory, and God’s mission. The result is a smart, clear, and responsible text on the theology of the church.

This book will be a most helpful resource for pastors, teachers, and students alike. Pastors will benefit from the well-conceived plan of the book, which helps them connect the biblical, historical, systematic, and practical aspects of the church to their own ministry. Teachers will welcome the clear writing and concise treatments of large chunks of Scripture and history on this topic. And students, especially undergraduates, will learn to love the church and why this matters to God.ctj rjgbhfqnth

Preparing SEBTS Students for the SBC Annual Meeting

As many readers will know, the SBC Annual Meeting will gather in Houston on June 11–12, 2013. In conjunction with the Convention, I teach an elective travel course at Southeastern Seminary titled The Southern Baptist Convention. The course is divided into three components. First, we meet on campus for one full day to discuss Southern Baptist history, theology, and polity, as well as specific information related to the upcoming annual meeting. Second, the students read several books and articles and listen to numerous audio resources related to these themes. Finally, the students attend the SBC Annual Meeting itself. While at the Convention, the students attend most of the proceedings, meet a couple of times with key SBC leaders, hobnob at the SEBTS booth, and attend the SEBTS Friends and Alumni Luncheon. Most also attend auxiliary events such as the Pastor’s Conference, Baptist 21 Luncheon, and 9 Marks at 9 events, among others.

I thought I would pass on to you some of the resources I use to prepare students for the SBC Annual Meeting. Obviously, we spend quite a bit of time walking through the Convention program, which, along with numerous other helpful resources, is available online. In addition to my lectures and guided class discussions, the students also watch or listen to several lectures, sermons, and panel discussions. This year, I’ve required them to watch the various Baptist 21 panel discussions from previous years (available at the B21 website), which are a helpful gauge of the “hot topics” in the SBC in recent years. I also required the students to watch one of the panels from last year’s 9 Marks at 9. The panel, which included Mark Dever, Al Mohler, and Danny Akin, discussed Fred Luter’s presidential election, the nature of SBC cooperation, and Calvinism, all of which remain important topics a year later.

I also point the students to four lectures or sermons. They watch David Dockery’s fine sermon “Participants and Partners in the Gospel,” which was preached in SEBTS chapel back in February. The sermon is vintage Dockery, calling for denominational unity around the gospel and basic Baptist orthodoxy for the sake of the Great Commission. Students also listen to Dockery’s lecture “The Southern Baptist Convention since 1979,” which helps to orient them to recent Baptist history. The final two lectures are Timothy George’s “The Future of Baptist Identity in a post-Denominational World,” which remains a timely topic, and Al Mohler’s “The Future of the Southern Baptist Convention,” an address that every Southern Baptist needs to listen to at least once.
The students read two books and over a dozen journal articles or book chapters. The first book is Roger Richards’ History of Southern Baptists (Crossbooks, 2012), which is the most recent history of the SBC. The second book is a helpful collection of essays titled The Great Commission Resurgence: Fulfilling God’s Mandate in Our Time (B&H Academic, 2010), edited by Chuck Lawless and Adam Greenway. The latter volume touches upon most of the current tension points in the SBC from a perspective that advocates unity for the sake of gospel advance.

Unfortunately, for reasons of copyright I can’t make most of the additional essays I require available outside of the class. The students read chapters, articles, and booklets written by SBC leaders and thinkers such as Danny Akin (on the Great Commission Resurgence), David Dockery (on Baptist theology), Nathan Finn (on Baptist identity, Calvinism, and the future of the SBC), Timothy George (on Baptist theology), John Hammett (on regenerate church membership and the ordinances), Chuck Lawless (on Calvinism), Al Mohler (on Baptist identity), Paige Patterson (on the Conservative Resurgence), Ed Stetzer (on missional churches), and Malcolm Yarnell (on the priesthood of all believers).

One resource that I can make available to you is Dr. Patterson’s e-booklet “The Southern Baptist Conservative Resurgence: The History, the Plan, the Assessment ” (Seminary Hill, 2012). In this booklet, was which was originally published as three separate articles in The Southwestern Journal of Theology, Dr. Patterson offers a first-hand account of the Conservative Resurgence. It is a helpful look at recent Baptist history from one of the most important shapers of that history. It is also a reminder that Dr. Patterson needs to publish a volume that brings together his collected articles and essays, a topic I have pestered him about in the past. (And again, now, on a public blog . . .)

Anyway, I hope you find these resources helpful. And I hope that many of you will consider attending the 2013 SBC Annual Meeting in Houston. Perhaps I will see many of you there.

(Note: This post was cross-published at Christian Thought & Tradition)online game car

Book Notice: “The Liberal Arts: A Student’s Guide” by Gene Fant

If you’re interested in Christ-centered learning, you’ll want to click here and make a purchase. Recently we posted about the new series Reclaiming the Christian Intellectual Tradition (Crossway) edited by David Dockery, President of Union University. One of the first installments in that series is Gene Fant’s, The Liberal Arts: A Student’s Guide. Fant is a professor of literature and vice president for academic administration at Union University. With earned degrees in Renaissance literature, biblical studies, English, anthropology, and education, Fant serves as an expert guide for college students into the art and science of liberal arts.

Fant believes that “Christ-centered learning as viewed through the Scriptures . . . is able to teach, to reprove, to correct, and to train in righteousness” (p. 21; cf. 2 Tim. 3:16–17). Thus The Liberal Arts explicates this truth, surveying the history of liberal arts education and cogently and compellingly arguing for Christ-centered learning in seven chapters:

Chapter 1: The Beginning of Wisdom

Chapter 2: Christian Responses to the Rise of Liberal Learning

Chapter 3: What’s So Liberal about Liberal Learning?

Chapter 4: Wisdom and Liberal Learning

Chapter 5: General Revelation and Liberal Learning

Chapter 6: Liberal Learning and the Core Curriculum

Chapter 7: Current Opportunities for (and Challenges to) Liberal Learning

Fant wonderfully balances the relationship between the arts and sciences in the liberal arts, always connecting the two to God’s word and God’s Son. For instance, chapter 5: General Revelation and Liberal Learning, examines the nature of stories (narrative) and science and the relation of each to objective truth. Fant thus states, “Truth is discovered and described, but it is independent from human affirmation, existing apart from our understanding and unchanged by discovery” (p. 62). This point undergirds scientific inquiry and literature, for “Christians . . . understand that Christ seeks to reconcile all things, including our stories” (p. 76). Hence, chapter 5 in particular is an example of what kind of presuppositions and motivations govern “Christ-centered” education.

While The Liberal Arts is intended as a student’s guide, in keeping with the series, this book will benefit all those interested in learning more about learning, especially from a Christian worldview. Indeed, college students of liberal arts colleges and universities especially will benefit from learning about the history and intention of the liberal arts.