In Case You Missed It

1) If you really (like under a rock) missed it this week, David Platt was elected was the new President of the International Mission Board.

2) Check out the reaction to Platt’s election from Russ Moore, J. D. Greear, and Paige Patterson.

3) Speaking of David Platt, he has a post on Life on Mission over at the SEND Network.

4) Chuck Quarles, SEBTS Professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology, writes about the devil’s lie over at B&H Academic.

5) Tony Merida, Associate Professor of Preaching at SEBTS and Pastor of Imago Dei Church in Raleigh, NC, writes about the essential secret of preaching.

In Case You Missed It

Each Friday at Between the Times we point you to some of this week’s blogposts we think worth your time. Some are written by Southeastern faculty, alumni, or students. Some are from others outside Southeastern who have something to say. Either way, we want to keep you updated in case you missed it.

1) Ed Stetzer discusses (and links to) the panel discussion on salvation and mission at SBC 2014. Well worth your time (also features David Platt, Trevin Wax, and Frank Page). 

2) First Things contributor and Princeton law professor, Robert P. George, has created an online plea for the victims in Iraq. Sign the plea here.

3) Does God view the Spirit wrought good works of Christians as “filthy rags”? Michael J. Kruger says No at TGC.

4) Russell Moore, President of the ERLC, addresses the violence in Ferguson, Missouri and the quest for racial justice.

5) SEBTS PhD student and managing editor of Lifeway’s Gospel Project, Trevin Wax, also discusses Ferguson, ripping the bandages off our racial wounds.

6) Chuck Lawless, Dean of Graduate Studies at SEBTS, gives 10 reasons why bi-vocational ministry matters at thomrainer.com.

Christ-Centered Exposition: Exalting Jesus in 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus

http://g.christianbook.com/g/ebooks/covers/w185/4/495904_w185.pngDon’t say we didn’t tell you. We’re telling you now. The Christ-Centered Exposition series (B&H) has officially launched with the publication of Christ-Centered Exposition: Exalting Jesus in 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus. The series editors—Danny Akin, David Platt, and Tony Merida—serve as authorial triumvirate for the first book. Future volumes will be written by Russell D. Moore, Matt Chandler, Francis Chan, Mark Dever, J. D. Greear, Eric Mason, Robert Smith, Matt Chandler, Francis Chan, Thabiti Anyabwile, Al Mohler, and Paige Patterson.

The Christ-Centered Exposition series is framed by certain convictions. From the back cover:

This series affirms that the Bible is a Christ-centered book, containing a unified story of redemptive history of which Jesus is the hero. We purpose to exalt Jesus from every book of the Bible. In doing this, we are not commending wild allegory or fanciful typology. We must be constrained to the meaning intended by the divine Author Himself, the Holy Spirit of God. However, we also believe that the Bible has a Messianic focus, and the authors in this series will exalt Christ from all of their texts.

The series editors express the determination to ensure exegetical accuracy in each of the works. They view pastors—especially those busy with the responsibilities of ministry—as the target audience for the series and for that reason include helpful illustrations and theologically driven applications.

These convictions and characteristics drive the first volume in the series, Exalting Jesus in 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus. Each major section of commentary includes a main idea, outline, brief discussion of the text according to this outline, and reflection and discussion questions. Where necessary, the authors include an “excursus,” or parenthetical discussion of a key issue from that passage. An example from 1 Timothy 1:3–20 illustrates this clear presentation.

The authors provide this main idea for the text: “Church leaders must lead God’s people to persevere in the gospel in the face of false teaching and other challenges” (p. 12). They then discuss this main idea through three major sections: We Must Guard the Gospel (1:3–11); We Must Celebrate the Gospel (1:12–17); We Must Fight for the Gospel (1:18–20). Akin, Platt, and Merida also provide an excurses on “The Three Moral Uses of the Law” (pp. 15–16) in which they conclude, “as we rest in the righteousness of Christ, possessed by the Spirit of Christ, compelled by the ongoing grace of Christ, we are led from the inside out to walk in God’s will. For the Christian, God’s law is no longer a crushing hammer but a divine guide.” Finally, the chapter ends with ten discussion questions (p. 21) such as, “How would you state the gospel in one sentence?” and “How do the three uses of God’s moral law apply to unbelievers? To believers?”

Highly recommended.