In Case You Missed It

Each Friday at Between the Times we point you to some of this week’s blogposts we think worth your time. Some are written by Southeastern faculty, alumni, or students. Some are from others outside Southeastern who have something to say. Either way, we want to keep you updated in case you missed it.

1) On Tuesday at thomrainer.com, Southeastern’s Dean of Graduate Studies and Professor of Missions and Evangelism, Chuck Lawless wrote about the 8 ways the enemy attacks the church.

2) Over at SEND Network, SEBTS alum and church planter Trevor Attwood discusses how a small church develops substantial leaders.

3) The foolishness of an Ebola doctor was actually part of God’s wisdom, says Collin Garbarino at First Things.

4) Selma Wilson, President of B&H Publishing, explains the top needs of teenage girls.

5) At CT magazine, Kate Tracey with an eye-opening piece on the world’s top church-destroying countries.

6) From last weekend, but a great reminder from Mark Movsesian on how we must, somehow, help Iraq’s Christians.

7) Alan Noble, assistant professor of English at Oklahoma Baptist University, asks: “Is Evangelical Morality Still Acceptable in America?” topodin

Edgar Aponte on North and Latin American Evangelicalism

Check out SEBTS Director of Hispanic Leadership Development, Edgar Aponte (@EdgarRAponte), over at Ed Stetzer’s blog, The Exchange. Edgar posts on how churches in the U.S. can serve their brothers and sisters in Latin America. Here’s an excerpt:

“We believe in a Latin America that can evangelize its own region and reach other parts of the world. But any sustainable Latino missionary movement must have a sound gospel foundation. If we do not train our pastors in how to put the Bible together and teach the whole counsel of God, they will continue to be vulnerable or sitting ducks of false gospels like the prosperity gospel, theological moralism, and religious syncretism.”

Read the whole thing here.

Carl Henry and Baptist Identity

These days, it seems as if everyone is talking about the late evangelical theologian Carl F. H. Henry (1913–2003). Greg Thornbury has authored a widely acclaimed new book titled Recovering Classic Evangelicalism: Applying the Wisdom and Vision of Carl F.H. Henry (Crossway, 2013). Thornbury, Collin Hansen, and John Starke recorded a conversation for The Gospel Coalition about a famous encounter between Henry and Karl Barth. A few months ago, Jason Duesing wrote an online essay honoring Henry in 100th year of his birth. The Carl Henry Center for Theological Understanding at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School is hosting a major academic conference later this year, among other Henry-related scholarly activities. If you’re not familiar with Henry, he was a founding faculty member of Fuller Theological Seminary, the first editor of Christianity Today, and one of the architects of postwar neo-evangelicalism. His book The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism (1947) offered a broadside against the fundamentalist tendency to divorce evangelism and social engagement, while his six-volume God, Revelation, and Authority (1976–1983) was one of the most important works of evangelical theology written in the second half of the 20th century. Though he is known primarily as an evangelical theologian, Henry was a Baptist. In fact, for much of his adult life he was a Southern Baptist. In 2004, Russell Moore wrote an article for The Southern Baptist Journal of Theology titled “God, Revelation, and Community: Ecclesiology and Baptist Identity in the Thought of Carl F. H. Henry.” Moore concludes that Henry was a convictional Baptist, but his ecclesiology was underdeveloped in his writings, in part because of his historical context. Simply put, few neo-evangelical theologians wrote on ecclesiology other than in the broadest strokes, in part because of the parachurch nature of postwar evangelicalism. I would say it like this: Henry was a conservative evangelical who held to Baptist ecclesiological convictions; the accent, however, was on the former aspect of his identity. By contrast, I consider myself an orthodox Baptist, which also makes me, by definition, a type of evangelical. I would encourage you to read Moore’s excellent essay to learn more about Henry’s Baptist identity. Henry himself discusses this topic in his essay “Twenty Years a Baptist,” which has most recently been reprinted in Why I Am a Baptist (B&H Academic, 2001), edited by Tom Nettles and Russell Moore. For an excellent short introduction to Henry’s thought, including his identity as an evangelical and Baptist theologian, see Al Mohler’s chapter on Henry in Theologians of the Baptist Tradition, edited by Timothy George and David Dockery (B&H Academic, 2001).

(Image credit; This post has been cross-published at Christian Thought & Tradition)online rpg mobile gamemobil game