The CGCS on Planting Churches to Fight Ebola

Every Wednesday we highlight the work of Southeastern’s Center for Great Commission Studies. Recently, Keelan Cook wrote about the efforts of a TN church to fight Ebola through church planting. 

Here’s an excerpt:

Several years ago, First Baptist Church in Humbolt, TN adopted the Susu people group in West Africa. The Susu are an unreached people group and staunchly Muslim. The spiritual soil is hard indeed. However, through obedience to the Great Commission, God has used this church to do miracles in West Africa.

 

The following update briefly discusses their missions strategy and its effectiveness. In addition, the villages where they worked to plant church are the same villages reeling with Ebola. Yet, God is working miracles in his church in this area. Read and see what it looks like for a church to roll up their sleeves and get involved in a specific area.

 

Read the full post here.

The CGCS on Christian Hospitality (Keelan Cook)

Every Wednesday morning we highlight the writing and work of the folks in the Center for Great Commission Studies. Recently, Keelan Cook, the Urban Resource Coordinator for the CGCS and PhD student at SEBTS, wrote about holiday hospitality and the Christian mission.

Here’s an excerpt:

Throughout the Old Testament, the people of God were commanded to welcome the sojourner (think Deut 10:19). The New Testament does not ease up on the issue either. Instead, the kingdom of God is radically inclusive, making no distinction between peoples. One need look no further than Jesus’ parable of the good samaritan (Luke 10) for a proper understanding of loving your neighbor. . . . Hospitality opens doors. Sharing a meal is more than a way into people’s homes, it is a way into their hearts.

Read the full post here.

CGCS: Ethnolinguistics and the Great Commission

On Wednesday mornings we highlight the work of Southeastern’s Center for Great Commission Studies. A few weeks ago, Keelan Cook wrote about the importance of ethnolinguistics in the church’s efforts to obey the great commission. He offers a helpful definition we thought our readers ought to see. 

Here’s an excerpt:

Ethnolinguistics deals with both language and culture. . . . 

 

Understanding the way people groups break down helps us do missions. If we can understand the way that the peoples of the world gather and identify themselves, then we are better at the task of sharing the gospel with them. We can do proclamation in their language and in their cultural way of seeing the world.

Read the full post here.