Southeastern at the 2014 ETS

Every fall semester, before the Thanksgiving holiday, droves of evangelical professors, pastors, and students descend upon an American city to gather for the annual meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society. This year, the meeting will be held November 19-21 in balmy San Diego, CA, with Ecclesiology as the central topic. As usual, many of our SEBTS faculty and PhD students will participate by reading academic papers, or serving as panelists or moderators for various discussions. The table below lists the time, topic, role, and location of each participant. If you live in or near San Diego, or you plan to attend ETS this year, be sure to check out the fine scholarship displayed by SEBTS folk.

Time Topic Person Role
Nov 19       8:30-11:40a Christian Ethics Section Erik Clary Moderator
9:20-10:00 Christian Ethics and the Fair Trade Movement Shaun Price Presenter
9:20-10:00 Matthew 27:52-53 as a Scribal Interpolation Charles Quarles Presenter
9:20-10:00 Believer Baptism: Human Act of Obedience and Divine Means of Grace John Hammett Presenter
11:00-11:40 Panel Discussion on Believer Baptism John Hammett Panelist
2:00-5:10p Christian Ethics: Was the Early Church Primarily Pacifist of Not? Daniel Heimbach Moderator
3:40-4:20 Can War Be Just? The Ancient Church and Pacifism Steven McKinion Presenter
4:30-5:10 Interaction on the Early Church and Pacifism Daniel Heimbach Panelist
4:30-5:10 Interaction on the Early Church and Pacifism Steven McKinion Panelist
2:00-5:10 A Conversation on Origins: BioLogos, Reasons to Believe, and Southern Baptists Ken Keathley Panelist
2:00-5:10 A Conversation on Origins: BioLogos, Reasons to Believe, and Southern Baptists James K. Dew Panelist
2:00-2:40 Does Luke 10:25-37 Echo 2 Chr 28:5-15? The Parable of the Good Samaritan and the Question if Its Historical Vorlage Gregory Stiekes Presenter
2:00-2:40 On Feeding the “Theologically Dead”-Rethinking Robert Rakestraw on the Vegetative State Erik Clary Presenter
2:00-2:40 Rescuing Rahab: The Evangelical Discussion on Conflicting Moral Absolutes David W. Jones Presenter
Nov 20       8:30-11:40a The Dark Side of Evangelical Ecumenism Nathan A. Finn Moderator
10:20-10:40 Respondent to Evangelical Ecumenism Papers Nathan A. Finn Presenter
9:20-10:50 Book Panel on In Search of Moral Knowledge by R. Scott Smith James K. Dew Panelist
3:00-6:10p Molinism Session Ken Keathley Moderator
3:00-3:40 Are there Signs of Late Biblical Hebrew in Isaiah 40-66? Mark Rooker Presenter

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Book Notice: “A Theology of Matthew” by Charles L. Quarles

Quarles_Matt picSoutheastern’s own Chuck Quarles, Professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology, has recently published yet another fine work in New Testament studies. Already the author of several books including The Cradle, The Cross, & The Crown and The Sermon on the Mount, Quarles recently published A Theology of Matthew: Jesus Revealed as Deliverer, King, and Incarnate Creator (P&R, 2013).

Quarles wrote the book in order to combat what he calls “the doctrinal anemia of the contemporary church.” “Doctrinal anemia,” Quarles writes, “involves ignorance of fundamental truths of the Christian faith that are essential to the salvation of individuals or necessary for the spiritual health of God’s people” (p. 1). He communicates to the reader the results of a survey he has administered regularly to college freshmen. The test does not measure their convictions, but only what they know or understand about the key doctrines of Christianity. Quarles’s findings are not heart warming: 78% think all people are basically good; 65% cannot identify the definition of new birth from a multiple-choice question; 54% think that faith in Jesus is unnecessary for salvation. The anemia continues on down the theological line (pp. 1–2).

Rather than allowing himself to descend into a state of weltscherz, Quarles aims to write biblical theology for the church. A Theology of Matthew is the first fruit of his desire to rectify things, and he launches the project by teaching us what Matthew thought of Jesus. “Rediscovery of biblical theology best begins with a rediscovery of who Jesus is and why he came. The Gospel of Matthew is an excellent place to rediscover the biblical view of Jesus” (p. 2).

Quarles does not simply describe Matthew’s Gospel or his theology. Quarles teaches readers how to study the Gospel. In part 1, he provides the foundations for this study by describing the key historical details of the Gospel––who, what, when, where, how, and why (ch. 1). He then explains the mutually interpreting ways we ought to read the Gospel (ch. 2). For instance, we do well to read the Gospel vertically and horizontally, and especially in the light of the Old Testament, which Matthew deeply relied upon.

In Parts 2–5, Quarles explores the theological themes that emerge from Matthew’s presentation of Jesus. Matthew presents Jesus as the New Moses (part 2), New David (part 3), New Abraham (part 4), and New Creator (part 5). Quarles expertly shows how these identities of Jesus––truly one, divine identity––tie together with his roles: our Savior (part 2), our King (part 3), our Founder (part 4), and our God (part 5). The back cover nicely summarizes Quarles’s approach: “Who is Jesus? Why should we worship him? This book answers these questions by surveying Matthew’s primary theological themes and how they interconnect with the rest of the Bible. Quarles focuses on Matthew’s portrait of Jesus as the Savior of sinners, the King of God’s people, the founder of a new Israel, and the incarnation of the Creator.”

Quarles has produced a coherent, clear, and moving exposition of the theology of Matthew. He has done this so that we might sit in awe of the treasures of Jesus. Yet, this is not all. “As amazing as it is to see Matthew’s awe-inspiring treasures on display, Matthew intends far more than this. . . . Matthew intends to share his treasure, not merely to show it. He longs for his treasure to become ours” (p. 193). Quarles shares this desire of Matthew, and he has expertly passed on Matthew’s theology to us so that we might truly know and worship Jesus.

Quarles also represents the commitment of SEBTS and its biblical studies faculty to serving the church through scholarship. Recent publications include but certainly are not limited to: Quarles, Andreas Köstenberger, and Scott Kellum, The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown (Broadman & Holman, 2009), and The Lion and The Lamb (B&H, 2012); Tracy McKenzie, Idolatry in the Pentateuch (Wipf & Stock, 2010); Ben Merkle edits the very helpful 40 Questions series (Kregel); Maurice Robinson, Analytical Lexicon of New Testament Greek: Revised and Updated. Co-edited with Mark House (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2012); Mark Rooker, The Ten Commandments: Ethics for the Twenty-First Century (B&H, 2010); Heath Thomas, Poetry & Theology in Lamentations: The Aesthetics of an Open Text (Sheffield, UK: Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2012); and numerous journal articles by these and others.

For those who seek to follow God’s call and keep the commands of Jesus Christ in the Great Commission, consider these SEBTS programs taught by Chuck Quarles and our other excellent biblical studies faculty.

The Bachelor of Arts in Christian Studies with a minor in Biblical Studies introduces undergraduate students to the knowledge and skills central to the work of pastors, particularly in the area of Old and New Testament competency. The Master or Arts (Biblical Languages) prepares students to serve as translators and as field supervisors for Bible translation teams. The Master of Arts (Old Testament) provides serious students with an opportunity for advanced study beyond the Master of Divinity or baccalaureate degrees.

The M.Div. with Pastoral Ministry prepares students for pastoral ministry in the local church with and is grounded in study of the Old and New Testament. The M.Div. with Christian Ministry offers the same strong core education while giving one freedom to pursue elective courses in the area of OT, NT, Hebrew and Greek. The M.Div. with Advanced Biblical Studies offers the greatest opportunity for focus in the biblical languages, preparing one for a pastoral or teaching ministry. The Th.M. in Biblical Studies equips post-M.Div. students who want to enhance their theological training, either for preparation for doctoral study or as an advanced degree for service in the church. Students can take the thesis or non-thesis tracks under the supervision of a professor in the area of Old Testament. Finally, the Ph.D. in Biblical Studies prepares students to teach the Bible and biblical languages to college or seminary students, and to write about the interpretation and theology of the OT and NT.

Click the links to find out more and apply.

 

 

Book Notice: “The World and The Word: An Introduction to the Old Testament”

You can no longer say that you were unaware: noted Old Testament scholar and SEBTS professor Mark F. Rooker is co-author (with Eugene H. Merrill and Michael A. Grisanti) of the newly released Old Testament intro text, The World and The Word: An Introduction to the Old Testament (B&H). Both those steeped in Old Testament study and those studying its treasures in-depth for the first time will benefit from this work.

The World and the Word is structured in seven parts, each providing the general and specific context for study of the OT in its parts and whole. Parts 1 through 3 provide the general introduction to the whole OT: part 1 establishes the Ancient Near Eastern historical-cultural and literary context for the OT; part 2 describes the often confusing but important topic of the composition and transmission of the OT; part 3 provides the scholarly context for OT study from an explicitly evangelical position. As such, these chapters (1-9) will aid the student and scholar with the most up-to-date discussions of the all-important context of the Old Testament.

Parts 4 through 7 provide the specific context for the Old Testament by way of introduction to each book. The Pentateuch (Part 4), Historical Books (Part 5), Prophetic Books (Part 6) and Poetic Books (Part 7) are examined in turn. Each chapter concisely examines the historical, literary, and theological features of a book and offers study questions to guide one’s reading. In his chapter on Isaiah, for example, Rooker ably treats the thorny issue of critical Isaiah scholarship on its dating and authorship with an eye toward the actual unity and theology of Isaiah. By summarizing the contents of the book, then, Rooker & Co. equip students for further study of Isaiah and enables them to begin making connections to the New Testament.

The World and The Word therefore makes key contributions to the field of Old Testament studies. First, it provides the historical, cultural, and literary contexts for the Old Testament canon. Second, it clearly explains the theology of the Old Testament itself in order to bring students into better understanding of the New Testament. Third, it does all this from an evangelical and pastoral perspective. As Merrill states in his introduction, the book “is designed to introduce the student to the Old Testament as a living Word of God, one whose serious and devout study will yield not only cognitive satisfaction but-and more important-entreé into the very heart and design of God who loves him and wishes to make him the special object of His grace.” The World and The Word should be on the shelf of all those who study or teach the Old Testament as students and scholars.