In Case You Missed It

At his personal blog, Tate Cockrell shared four ways you can help your graduate. Dr. Cockrell writes:

Today I get the privilege of participating in commencement exercises at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary where I serve as Assistant Director of Doctor of Ministry Programs and Associate Professor of Counseling. It’s a highlight of the semester. Watching men and women receive their diplomas and doctoral hoods after years of hard work and sacrifice is a joy to watch. I was once where they are and remember all too well the immense feeling of relief of completing one phase of the journey.

 

This time of year graduates from preschools, grade schools, high schools, universities, graduate schools, and trade schools all over the world will have similar experiences. Here are four ways you can help the graduates in your life.

Art Rainer recently shared five career tips for recent college graduates:

Class of 2017,

Congratulations! You made it. You did the homework assignments. You completed the group projects. You wrote the papers. And you passed the exams. Now you are officially a college graduate.

 

For many college graduates, the next step is diving into a career. If this is you, here are a few tips to get you started

 

Earlier this week, Dr. Danny Akin shared sixteen commitments for a faithful ministry of preaching.

Whenever I teach my students the practice of biblical exposition, I always challenge them to develop their convictions about preaching and let those guide and shape their preaching ministry. I have done so myself. In class, I explain the following 16 commitments that I believe a pastor or preacher should have in the ministry of preaching.

 

At The Center for Great Commission Studies, Scott Hildreth shared ten ways to be missional this summer. Dr. Hildreth writes:

Today kicks off the Summer semester for our students. Some will continue taking classes. Others will spend the summer at home with families. A different group will be involved in ministries or missionary activities. The hope is that all of our students will seek ways to make this summer a missional season. No matter where God leads them, we are praying they will make a gospel difference in someone’s life. Week after week, class after class, chapel after chapel, we remind our students that they have been entrusted with the treasure of the gospel and have been given the commission to pass it along to others.

 

In this post, we are going to give tips for making a missionary difference this summer. Don’t be overwhelmed by the list. Pick one or two and start there — then let’s see what happens.

 

Matt Sliger posted an article at Founders Ministries discussing the value of seminary.

You’re probably not the smartest guy in the room, but you might think you are. That’s one reason you should consider seminary.

 

As nearly all women daydream about, last Friday my wife and I celebrated our 10th wedding anniversary at a seminary graduation. Neither of us had a clue on May 12, 2007 that we’d spend the first decade of matrimony scouring footnotes late at night and writing on holidays. Ten years and two kids later, we’ve somewhat been forced to reflect on the value of that investment. While we might appeal to a number of rationales, the primary role of theological education in my life has been to persistently remind me of my ignorance.

 

I’ve listed below four adverse effects on ministry preparation, if you’re regularly the smartest guy in the room (or think you are).

 

At The Peoples Next Door, Meredith Cook shared about the necessity of community.

I recently traveled to North Carolina for my seminary graduation, and while there, I was able to spend time with friends from the church I was a member of while living there. We had a great community in Raleigh and are looking forward to growing our community here in Houston. Our church in North Carolina kept us accountable, provided for us, served us, and allowed themselves to be inconvenienced for us. And we did the same for them.

 

We are made to be in community. On the flight home to Houston, I saw an ad for an app called “Mittcute” which allows users to meet new people based on similar interests such as kayaking, hiking, reading, or cooking. This isn’t the first I’ve heard of such a service. Even the secular world is recognizing that people are not meant to do life alone and is seeking to rectify loneliness through apps, community events, social media, etc. As believers, though, we have something better. We have the church.

In Case You Missed It

At The Peoples Next Door, Meredith Cook shared an article discussing how we should serve our churches. Meredith writes:

Have you ever taken a spiritual gift inventory? I have, and I assume many who are reading this blog have as well. Spiritual gift inventories, while a bit simplistic and overgeneralizing, can be helpful if you don’t know how you are gifted. However, they do not address the underlying purpose of spiritual gifts, nor do they accurately tell us what to do with the gifts once we know what they are. We need to understand what the Bible says about them, and let it tell us how to use them.

 

There are several passages that discuss giftings, but I will mainly focus on 1 Corinthians 12.

 

Art Rainer posted at his personal blog discussing why we should stop multitasking.

How often to you attempt to multitask to become more productive?

I often find myself doing this. Even as I write this, my phone sits next to me. I’m tempted to stop writing and check a few emails.

 

But I shouldn’t.

 

I don’t multitask well. And neither do you. This is what research about our brains and our attempts to juggle several tasks at once tells us. Studies consistently show us that God did not create most of our brains to do multiple tasks at the same time. We are at our best when we focus on a single task. So what does happen when you multitask? It’s probably not increasing productivity. Let’s look at what you are really doing when you “multitask.”

 

At his personal blog, Matt Emerson posted a touching tribute to Dr. John Sailhamer who passed away earlier this week.

I learned on Twitter earlier that John Sailhamer has passed away.  Due to his failing health over the last decade, his last major project – The Meaning of the Pentateuchwas published way back in 2009. In our consumer-driven, what-have-you-done-for-me-lately American culture, that may as well have been a century ago. But Sailhamer’s influence has always been more about his positive impact on students than his publishing per se. If you read his books – The Pentateuch as Narrative, Introduction to Old Testament Theology,The Meaning of the Pentateuch, even Genesis Unbound, as well as his commentaries – it seems obvious that these arise directly out of his teaching. And if you talk to his students, they’ll confirm that this is in fact the case.

 

Bruce Ashford posted an article at the Intersect Project  website discussing three authors who changed his life. Dr. Ashford writes:

In the space of two years in Russia, I began to realize even more fully the deep and resonant effects of religion upon culture, and vice versa. I was living in a social and cultural context that had been almost entirely devoid of evangelical gospel influence for generations. Conversations with many of my students revealed a deep skepticism about whether God existed, whether life had any meaning, and whether there are any moral absolutes. The institutions of this country — including its government, businesses, marriages and schools — reflected this deep sense of loss, this sense that its people could no longer believe in a God who endowed their lives with meaning and purpose or who gave moral law by which all people and institutions should abide.

 

During this time, I began to read books by Christian thinkers such as Abraham Kuyper, Francis Schaeffer and C. S. Lewis. (On my journey to Russia, I carried one suitcase of clothes and four suitcases of books.) What I read changed my life.

 

At The Gospel Coalition, Tony Merida shared six ways to stir your affections for weekly preaching.

Foundational instruction in expository preaching tends to focus on theology and methodology. This makes sense. Expository preaching is a theologically driven approach to preaching. We don’t commend this approach because we think it’s a great church growth idea, but primarily because of our theological convictions. Our convictions about God, humanity, the gospel, the nature of the Bible, the work of the Spirit, the centrality of Christ, the church, the role of pastors, the coming judgment, and more should lead us to embrace a high view of biblical preaching.

 

After theology, we then talk methodology. How do you prepare Bible-saturated sermons? How do you preach systematically through books of the Bible? Here we often discuss matters like studying the text in detail, considering the redemptive-historical context (how the text points to Jesus), identifying a dominant theme, constructing an outline, explaining and applying the text, and adding an introduction and conclusion.

 

But theology and methodology shouldn’t be all we emphasize. We can become skilled at crafting sermons, but not be affected by the Savior. If we don’t guard our hearts, sermon preparation can become mechanical. We must avoid becoming what I call “the Sermonator”—the pastor who mechanically cranks out sermons devoid of heartfelt passion.

 

Good exposition isn’t merely theological and methodological; it’s also affectional. It includes both light and heat, intellect and affections, seeing and savoring. It involves preaching the text from your own heart to your people’s hearts.

 

For those committed to exposition who have a sermon preparation routine, a vital question is this: How can we stir our affections for Sunday? Here are six ways.

 

Dr. Alvin Reid posted an article at The Center for Great Commission Studies discussing the tension of Evangelism.

Tension.

 

What does this word conjure up in your mind?

 

I asked a class this week whether their immediate response to the word “tension” was positive or negative. Almost all said negative. We see tension as something bad, something that’s a nuisance at best or a hindrance at worst.  I would beg to differ. Our world would not function without tension. Try building a bridge without it. Try walking upright without it. I know; for a while I could not walk upright because of lumbar spine issues. My body simply could not maintain the appropriate tension to stand up straight without pain.

In Case You Missed It

At The Peoples Next Door, Meredith Cook shared a post discussing how to survive the church as an introvert. Meredith writes:

If you register “I” on the spectrum of “HANG OUT WITH ALL THE PEOPLE” to “give me solitude or give me death”, then you, like me, probably struggle with community in the church. As an introvert, the balance between needing alone time to recharge and not neglecting others is hard. It is easy to value that time so much you neglect what is a necessary and biblical part of the Christian life — the church. I am guilty of, and I have witnessed others, using my so-called introversion as an excuse to neglect the church.

 

While I think there is some validity to the extrovert/introvert spectrum and how we relate to people, it is also largely a Western concept bred out of individualism and our desire to dictate who/what/when/where we spend time with people. However, this is not how we see believers relating to each other in the Bible. Christian community is illustrated throughout the Bible and rarely, if ever, do we see an individual forsaking people to get their alone time.

 

Aaron Earls posted an article at the Lifeway Pastor’s blog discussing the pastor’s challenge in recovering from the Christmas rush.

For many, work slows down during the Christmas season, but not for pastors. All the holiday festivities bring even more responsibilities. But no you’ve made it through the musicals, the small group parties, the Christmas Eve service, the increased benevolence demands from the community, and the extra visitors in the pews.

 

Hopefully, in the midst of it all, you’ve had a moment of peace to reflect on the coming of the Prince of Peace and an opportunity to celebrate with your family the Father sending the Son as the baby in a manger. But now what? As the Christmas season close to a close, how should you spend the last few days of the year? Here are five things you can do before the new year begins a new batch of tasks.

 

Paul Akin posted an article at the ERLC website titled: “Lottie Moon: A pioneer advocate for limitless sending.” Paul writes:

Billions of people are born, live their entire lives, and die without ever hearing the good news of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

 

Maybe you should read that sentence again, just to give it time to sink in.

 

Currently, there are more than seven billion people in the world. Missiologists estimate that over 2.8 billion of those people have little to no access to the gospel. That is a huge number, and its reality demands a limitless missionary force to take the gospel to unreached peoples and places around the world.

 

Jesus exhorted his disciples, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few, therefore pray earnestly to the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest” (Matt. 9:37–38). The same truth remains today.

 

Art Rainer recently shared nine steps to enjoying a sporting event with your kids on the cheap.

I love going to sporting events. So do my kids, ages three and six. But as you know, going to a sporting event can be a costly endeavor. Just about every part of the experience is expensive. And there is nothing worse than spending all that money and not walking away with an enjoyable memory. Over the past few years, I have been able to develop my own steps for creating an enjoyable memory with my kids at a sporting event.

 

How do I do it? Here are nine steps to enjoying a sporting even with young kids on the cheap

 

At his personal blog, Chuck Lawless shared twelve questions he’d like to ask pastors with 40+ years of experience. Dr. Lawless writes:

This year, I celebrated my 35th year in full-time ministry. I rejoice over God’s faithfulness through the years, but I’m also aware that I’m always one step away from falling. When I think about that reality, I’d love to convene a group of pastors with 40+ years of ministry behind them and ask them these questions