In Case You Missed It

1) A must read article by Graeme Wood at The Atlantic on the apocalyptic dreams and motives of ISIS and how the U.S. and allies must understand these motives in order to successfully fight them.

2) On the note of ISIS, Russ Moore addressed the question of whether we should pray for the defeat or conversion of ISIS. Hint: it’s not an either/or answer.

3) Greg Mathias, Associate Director for the Center for Great Commission Studies, discusses how Christians ought to respond to the recent murder of three Muslim college students in Chapel Hill, NC.

4) Trevin Wax lists several questions that, if we answer no to them, show our unfaithfulness to Christ’s command to tell the good news about him.

5) At SEND Network, Paul Tripp writes about our difficulty with but need to minister to others during our own suffering.

The Gospel in Three Directions

In his weekly installment, J. D. Greear reflects on the three directions of the gospel. Here’s an excerpt:

The gospel points UPWARD, redirecting our worship.

 

Sin problems don’t start as sin problems. They start as worship problems. At the root of all sin, as the Apostle Paul explains, is the colossal mistake of “giving the glory of God to created things” (Romans 1:23). The Hebrew word for glory (kabod) carried the connotation of “weight.” The Greek word for glory (doxa) hints at ideas of majesty and beauty. Put the two together and you get a good idea of the problem: we gave a weightiness and a beauty to things more than we gave to God. As Matt Papa says in Look and Live, sin is simply worship misdirected.

 

To change sin at the heart level, which is where God wants to change it, he has to change what we worship. As Paul Tripp puts it, “If we worship our way into sin, we have to worship our way out.” The gospel, and the gospel alone, does that, redirecting our worship and reigniting our passions. It points us upward to a God who is better and more glorious and more satisfying than any of our pathetic idols.

Read the full post here.