Martin Luther’s Rendition of “Let it Go”

Translator’s note: On August 1521, Martin Luther was called before the Diet of Worms and asked to recant of his views. After taking a night to consider what he’d do next, Luther was brought before the Diet the next day. While there, he sang the most famous ballad in Protestant history. I have transcribed it below, from the original German, and translated it into English.

My tonsured head glows white at the Diet tonight
Your reflection, could be seen
The Church has isolated me,
Cajetan was really mean

The wind is howling like this swirling storm inside
Couldn’t keep it in, Karlstadt knows I tried

Don’t let them in, don’t let them sense
You’ll go to heaven if you buy an indulgence
Conceal, don’t feel, don’t let them know
Well, now they know

Let it go, let it go
I’m justified by faith alone
Let it go, let it go
To act against my conscience would be wrong

I don’t care
What they’re going to say
Let this Diet rage on,
The Pope never bothered me anyway

It’s funny how the Scripture
Makes works-righteousness seem dope
And the fears that once controlled me
Are the fault of the Pope

It’s time to tell them what I learned
To test the limits and hope that I don’t burn
No Popes, no bulls, no canon law
I think James is an epistle of straw

Let it go, let it go
I won’t recant what I believe
Let it go, let it go
Last night I drenched the Devil in ink

Here I stand
And here I’ll stay
My conscience captive to the Word

My writings spread to German villages all around
The peasants love me, though I’ll burn them to the ground
And one thought festers in my constipated bowels
I’m never going back,
They’ll have to kill me now

Let it go, let it go
I’ll be starting my own church
Let it go, let it go
I’ll have to hide out for some time first

Here I stand
And here I’ll stay
I’ll marry my Kate
The Pope never bothered me anyway


Recommendation: Alister McGrath’s Glossary of Theological Terms

One of the fun things about teaching church history is introducing my students to all kinds of technical theological terms that they should never (ever!!!) use in a sermon, but nevertheless probably need to know. I require students in all of my classes to purchase a copy of the Pocket Dictionary of Theological Terms and bring it with them to class. They are not allowed to ask me to define a term in class unless they have first consulted the Pocket Dictionary to see if it is included therein.

I recently discovered that Alister McGrath has a glossary of theological terms on his Wiley-Blackwell author’s page. For those of you who haven’t heard of McGrath, he is arguably one of the two or three best-known evangelical theologians in the English-speaking world. He has written dozens of book on systematic theology, historical theology, spirituality, the Reformation, C. S. Lewis, and the relationship between theology and science. He is a sharp cookie. If you want to learn more about McGrath’s thoughts on some of these topics, check out my colleague Jamie Dew’s book Science and Theology: An Assessment of Alister McGrath’s Critical Realist Perspective and SEBTS alum Larry McDonald’s book The Merging of Theology and Spirituality: An Examination of the Life and Work of Alister E. McGrath.

Even if you don’t want to learn more about McGrath’s thought, avail yourself of his super-helpful glossary of theological terms. Your friends will be impressed when you tell them that Hesychasm is “A tradition, especially associated with the eastern church, which places considerable emphasis upon the idea of “inner quietness” (Greek: hesychia) as a means of achieving a vision of God. It is particularly associated with writers such as Simeon the New Theologian and Gregory Palamas.” Don’t you feel more theologically astute already?