The Paradox of Assurance

In this weekly installment from J. D. Greear, he talks about the paradox of assurance of salvation. As one who struggled mightily for assurance J. D. speaks with some experiential and pastoral wisdom. Here’s an excerpt:

God won’t keep us in the dark. His Word, after all, is “a lamp unto my feet.” But we’re usually asking for a spotlight to show us the end of the path. And what God gives us is enough for the next step. He is patiently drawing you forward, wooing you to him as he develops your faith. Don’t confuse his patience with his absence. Take the step of faith, and he’ll meet you there.

Read the full post here.

Balanced: Truth and Love in Salvation and Mission

I am the supervising professor for a doctor of ministry student here at the seminary who is trying to graduate this spring. I had the privilege of directing the program for a several years and have always loved the students. The program is in far better hands now but I still get to interact some with them. One of the reasons I enjoy them so much is the fact that probably close to 90 percent of D.Min. students at Southeastern are pastors or missionaries in real ministry contexts. My own experience draws me to them.

The student I am supervising who is seeking to finish within a few days is an incredible guy. He is an Ethiopian pastor who leads a church in the Raleigh area. The church reaches out to the Ethiopian peoples of the region in language and culture. God is richly blessing his ministry and their covenant community. He is a sharp student and a great leader. I am probably learning far more from him than he is from me.

He is writing about a holistic approach to evangelism. This may sound odd to us but not for those from within his people group. In the Ethiopian context the word for salvation, for instance, means to be completely saved. Holistically saved. Just as Greek word for salvation can mean saved spiritually or physically depending upon the context, so it is in their language. For the Ethiopian believer, therefore, to be saved means to be saved spiritually, physically, mentally, emotionally and even relationally. They do not think about trying to separate or compartmentalize the various spheres of life and existence like we often do in the American context. Somehow I feel they might be closer to the biblical context than we are at times.

He is writing specifically about the balance between personal proclamation evangelism where one is focused on sharing the gospel in hopes of spiritual conversion and social ministry based evangelism ministries; the discussion of the Great Commission and the Great Commandment so to speak. It would be difficult for him to divide the need to share the gospel with someone or to love that person by taking care of their needs. To love God and your neighbor would be part of the Great Commission in his mind, and in the fullest sense of meaning.

There is no doubt if one must choose that he recognizes the primacy of the salvation of the soul for eternity as compared to the temporal needs of people. Do not worry, he is theologically and soteriologically sound. (My name will be on this paper!) He just would wonder, why do we have to choose to do one or the other if we can do both?

The reason I am writing this blogpost is to prompt you to think about your balance in these areas. I have known some folks who can quote every theologian but are, quite frankly, pretty lousy at loving people. I have known others who cannot stand for truth because they are overwhelmed by their relationally driven emotions. I know some who are so uncaring they do not share the gospel. I know others who share the gospel but really do not seem to care for the people. Who are you? How is your balance?

I like talking with my student. I like talking about this balance. I am thankful to God to be able to think about and praise Him for totally saving me––all of me. I pray my balanced sanctification and obedience to Him will bring Him the glory He deserves.

In Case You Missed It

1) John Hammett, John Leadley Dagg Chair of Systematic Theology, writes about salvation and God’s mission, including the extent of the atonement, at Ed Stetzer’s blog.

2) Timothy George, Dean of Beeson Divinity School in Birmingham, Alabama, reflects on Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s advent reflections while in prison. Only prisoners understand that from which they have been set free.

3) Ed Stezter shares Part 3 of LifeWay’s research on the church and mental illness. Well worth keeping up with this research.

4) At CT, Ruth Moon with some interesting research findings on whether pastors think the gospel mandates racial reconciliation.

5) At SEND Network, NAMB President Kevin Ezell reflects on God’s work in 2014.

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