In Case You Missed It

Yesterday, SEBTS English professor Matthew Mullins published an article at First Things magazine about the fiftieth anniversary of the Voting Rights Act. Dr. Mullins writes:

Today marks the fiftieth anniversary of the Voting Rights Act. But with the 2016 elections just over a year away, the passing of the VRA has taken on new meaning. In June of 2013, a 5-4 majority of the Supreme Court invalidated key provisions of the VRA. In his majority opinion, Chief Justice John Roberts declared the section of the Act requiring “preclearance” from certain states and districts unconstitutional. This ruling allows these jurisdictions to make changes in voting laws with greater ease. Many have already done so, and some of the results suggest that we may have more reasons to mourn the passing of the VRA than to celebrate its passage.

Karen Swallow Prior published a story earlier this week at Think Christian about mourning Mark Zuckerberg’s miscarriages in the shadow of Planned Parenthood. In her article Karen raises an interesting point around potential life and actual life:

I can’t help but think that the contradictory ideas society holds about unborn children (who are considered babies when wanted and something else when not) owes in part to our tendency to conceive of child bearing as product- rather than process-oriented. The very term reproduction reflects such thinking. Our tendency, even within the church, to think with the product – rather than the means – in mind has dulled our understanding of a crucial distinction between potential life and actual life.

On his blog, Chuck Lawless gives 10 reasons pornography has power.

I suspect most if not all of the readers of this post know somebody who has struggled with pornography. From the teenager struggling with new desires to the senior pastor recently caught in sin, even believers wrestle with this sin. Perhaps if we understand why pornography has so much power, we would know better how to fight against it.

Thom Rainer posted an article about which books he would keep if he could only have 25 books in his minister’s library.

I began the process thinking it would be a simple exercise. I was wrong! I had great trouble narrowing the list to 25. Here are some of the parameters I used.

  • I didn’t hesitate to choose books that were simply personal preferences.
  • I decided at the onset I would strive to choose a variety of issues and topics, rather than just the 25 best books.
  • I was sufficiently lacking in humility, and put two of my own books on the list.
  • I really struggled eliminating many commentaries of individual Bible books.

Selma Wilson writes a reminder to parents: Building a yes home prepares your children to say yes to God.

Sure, children need direction and discipline. Along with boundaries, however, children crave a place to exercise physically, intellectually, emotionally, and spiritually. A yes home, with clearly established boundaries, gives them room to stretch, run, and grow with you close by.

In Case You Missed It

Each Friday at Between the Times we point you to some of this week’s blogposts we think worth your time. Some are written by Southeastern faculty, alumni, or students. Some are from others outside Southeastern who have something to say. Either way, we want to keep you updated in case you missed it.

1) On Tuesday at thomrainer.com, Southeastern’s Dean of Graduate Studies and Professor of Missions and Evangelism, Chuck Lawless wrote about the 8 ways the enemy attacks the church.

2) Over at SEND Network, SEBTS alum and church planter Trevor Attwood discusses how a small church develops substantial leaders.

3) The foolishness of an Ebola doctor was actually part of God’s wisdom, says Collin Garbarino at First Things.

4) Selma Wilson, President of B&H Publishing, explains the top needs of teenage girls.

5) At CT magazine, Kate Tracey with an eye-opening piece on the world’s top church-destroying countries.

6) From last weekend, but a great reminder from Mark Movsesian on how we must, somehow, help Iraq’s Christians.

7) Alan Noble, assistant professor of English at Oklahoma Baptist University, asks: “Is Evangelical Morality Still Acceptable in America?” topodin

In Case You Missed It

Each Friday at Between the Times we point you to some of this week’s blogposts we think worth your time. Some are written by Southeastern faculty, alumni, or students. Some are from others outside Southeastern who have something to say. Either way, we want to keep you updated in case you missed it.

1) In light of the recent immigration crisis, Bruce Ashford, Provost at Southeastern, explains the need to balance justice and mercy in our Christian response to real people in need. The ERLC’s Canon and Culture published his essay.

2) Walter Strickland, Special Advisor to the President for Diversity & Instructor of Theology at Southeastern, talks about the challenge to enjoy the diverse tapestry of God’s church. The post appeared on July 17 at Ed Stetzer’s blog.

3) Speaking of Ed Stetzer, he wrote a helpful piece on how churches can avoid the pitfall of syncretism.

4) Jeff Iorg, President of Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary, writes about the new normal on T.V. amounting to no more than “pixilated porn.” See the post from July 14.

5) Selma Wilson, President of B&H Publishing Group, discusses the real leadership test. Who leads when you’re gone?

6) Chuck Lawless, Dean of the Graduate Studies and Professor of Missions and Evangelism at Southeastern,  lists 10 reasons why church members don’t invite others to church. From thomrainer.com.

7) Trevin Wax, Managing Editor of Lifeway’s Gospel Project and PhD Student at Southeastern, describes the nature of true repentance.

 

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