New Book: Entrusted to the Faithful

Image Source: Rainer Publishing

Dr. Kenneth Coley, the Director of the Doctor of Education program at Southeastern Seminary has a edited a new book: Entrusted to the Faithful: An Introduction to Pastoral Leadership.

The book includes chapters by eight current and former Southeastern faculty members: Drs. Kenneth Coley, David Beck, Allan Moseley, Steven Wade, James Porowski, Larry Purcell, J. Gregory Lawson, and John Boozer.

With each passing year of the 21st century, pastoral ministry is becoming more complex. Leading a church is not easy. The contributors to this book have accepted the challenge to assist contemporary church leaders with this very real struggle. Entrusted to the Faithful is a valuable tool for an individual currently in ministry or for one who is preparing for future service in the local church. Filled with case studies and practical advice, pastoral staff can use this book for team building and problem solving. Instructors in traditional classrooms, hybrid courses, or online classes will find the format of the book ideal for university or seminary classes.

The authors of these chapters are superb examples of two qualifications: fidelity to the truth and ability to teach. In addition, they celebrate the significance of what the Lord has entrusted to them and eagerly commit it to you in the pages of this book. This work reflects several of the on-going tensions in contemporary theological education. The authors are at once scholars in their disciplines and practitioners with decades of experience in pastoral ministry. They have spent time both in dusty library shelves looking for clues to the answers to ancient questions and in dusty streets of a developing nations exploring contemporary expressions of these questions. The topics chosen for each chapter represent a dimension of significant importance in the local church as well as the subject of centuries of academic research and debate.

 

 

In Case You Missed It

Earlier this week at his blog, Dr. Danny Akin shared about preaching books for the beginning expositor. Dr. Akin writes:

Recently I was asked a question about a textbook that would help prepare and deliver expository sermons. No one hates self-promotion more than I! Having said that, for the beginner in this high and holy calling, I would commend Engaging Exposition written by myself, Bill Curtis and Stephen Rummage.

 

Dr. Bruce Ashford published an article this week discussing an evangelical response to fake news, cynicism, and “PC” conformity.

The past year in American politics has put on full display the social, cultural, and political breakdown we are experiencing in the United States. Evangelicals, we need to find a way to make things right again, and we can’t count on talk show hosts or politicians to do this. It’s up to us—ordinary citizens of the United States—to help restore the health of our nation, and we should start by doing three things.

 

At The Center for Great Commission Studies, Dr. George Robinson wrote discussing how our curriculum alone will not make disciples.

Henry Blackaby. Beth Moore. “Explore the Bible”. “The Gospel Project”.  I’m thankful to God for them all.  Blackaby’s “Experiencing God” helped me to understand that as a Christian I needed to “Find where God is at work and join Him.”  Moore taught my wife that her identity is in Christ through a myriad of her Bible studies.  Both “Explore the Bible” and “The Gospel Project” are Sunday School/Small Group curricula put out by Lifeway Christian Resources helping literally millions of Christians to faithfully interpret the Bible and to grow in their relationship to God.   Most of them are good! But none of these curricula are effective (or even intended) at making reproducing disciples – at least not on their own.  Why?  Because curricula don’t make disciples.

 

At his blog The Wardrobe Door, Aaron Earls discussed two questions every Christian must answer. Aaron writes:

Every generation of believers faces their own unique set of challenges and questions. Different temptations hold cultural sway and attempt to pull Christians off course in different eras.

 

Yet, as the writer of Ecclesiastes said, “There is nothing new under the sun.” These challenges, questions and temptations have been around before—in different forms and different combinations, yes, but we do not face unknown riddles.

 

Today, many Christians are stumbling over how we respond to an unchanging Scripture and a changing world. With that, there are two distinct temptations those of us who are following Jesus today must face.

 

How we respond to these two questions will determine our faithfulness in this generation.

 

Chris Martin posted this week with three reasons we should not use social media.

My job is to help authors leverage blogs and social media to use the gifts God has given them to serve the Church in her mission of making disciples.

 

But man, I really wish social media would just disappear sometimes. Don’t you?

 

Usually, the times I wish social media would disappear come about when I see Christians behaving badly on social media in such a way that it makes Jesus or the Church look bad.

 

I tend to think everyone should be on social media (and that everyone should have a blog). I think this because I think God has gifted everyone with unique insights and abilities that, if shared, may be used for the building up of the body of Christ.

 

But, sometimes it’s smart to keep yourself off of social media. Some of us are prone to certain sinful attitudes or postures that may make social media more harmful than helpful for us. Sometimes it’s smart to avoid social media altogether. Here are three reasons you should NOT use social media.

 

This was a great week in Chapel at Southeastern. We were blessed with powerful sermons from two members of our faculty: Dr. Chuck Quarles and Dr. Steven Wade. Be sure to check out the videos below if you missed them earlier in the week.

Dr. Chuck Quarles, The Sound of Silence: Ezekiel 33:1-11

 

 

Dr. Steven Wade, While We Wait: Titus 2:11-14