In Case You Missed It

1) From First Things, Timothy George discusses the need for a thicker kind of mere Christianity, the kind originally intended.

2) Michael Kruger looks at Psalm 119 and describes five things every Christian should be doing with God’s word.

3) Ross Douthat of the New York Times critiques Ann Coulter’s critique of American Christianity, that it is too focused on international efforts and not enough on the States.

4) At his blog, the Exchange, Ed Stetzer interviews SEBTS Provost Bruce Ashford about cultural engagement, in every square inch of the culture.

In Case You Missed It

1) Eric Geiger reflects on Easter Sunday and the good news that Jesus is still alive.

2) The increasing cultural acceptance of same-sex marriage likely will have some legal impact on the church. So, at TGC, Christiana Holcomb lists five actions that churches should take in a changing legal culture.

3) From First Things, Timothy George meditates on the raising of Lazarus and The Fierce Christ of Easter Faith.

4) Matthew’s Gospel records not only Jesus’ resurrection but the resurrection of many others. At Desiring God, Jonathan Dodson considers those other resurrections.

5) Finally, check out this very interesting Pew Research prediction of how the number of Muslims and Christians will change by 2050, posted by Sarah Eekhoff Zylstra at CT.

In Case You Missed It

1) John Hammett, John Leadley Dagg Chair of Systematic Theology, writes about salvation and God’s mission, including the extent of the atonement, at Ed Stetzer’s blog.

2) Timothy George, Dean of Beeson Divinity School in Birmingham, Alabama, reflects on Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s advent reflections while in prison. Only prisoners understand that from which they have been set free.

3) Ed Stezter shares Part 3 of LifeWay’s research on the church and mental illness. Well worth keeping up with this research.

4) At CT, Ruth Moon with some interesting research findings on whether pastors think the gospel mandates racial reconciliation.

5) At SEND Network, NAMB President Kevin Ezell reflects on God’s work in 2014.

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