In Case You Missed It

Dr. Don Whitney recently published an article discussing how when one is struggling to find a way to serve the church, sometimes the best way is to simply invent a ministry. Dr. Whitney writes:

They don’t want to be mere religious consumers at church. Instead they want to minister, and do so in a way that glorifies God, strengthens the church, provides an example to their children, and edifies themselves. With everything else going on in their lives at this time, and with the limited options for ministry at their church, what should they do? For many people, a simple, creative solution is to invent a ministry.

Recently D. A. Horton published an article on his blog about the 60th anniversary of the murder of Emmett Till. He writes:

As I reflect on the life, death, and legacy of both Emmett and Mamie Till-Mobley, I’m naturally drawn to the truth of the gospel. Everyone involved in Emmett’s story needs Christ. Everyone impacted by Emmett’s story needs Christ. Everyone who is just now hearing of Emmett’s story needs Christ. Therefore, the story of Christ must be made known.

There are so many gospel parallel’s with Emmett’s story I’d be foolish to not expound on a few of them. If anyone can sympathize with the grief of losing a son in the most violent and horrific way, its God.

For the past two years, SEBTS has been blessed by Ali through her employment with the seminary, and Ali also recently finished classes for her Master of Arts in Ministry Leadership. After graduation she felt the call to serve in a remote region of South Asia. Earlier this week, she posted this blog post on the website of the CGCS:

From class lectures to chapel to publications, getting the gospel to the ends of the earth infused every part of my work and studies at Southeastern. My experiences at Southeastern are leading me to spend three months on the international mission field. This might not seem like much, as many people have gone to harder, more difficult places for longer periods of time. However, to me as a woman in her late 20s, it’s no small thing to leave my job and the comforts of home to go.

Shaunti Feldhahn recently posted this article on Christianity Today discussing how the Ashley Madison leak exposes more than just names:

There’s something more important here than the Ashley Madison issue itself: a vast disconnect between men and women on modern sex-related issues that affect nearly all men and boys every single day – but which many women aren’t even aware of. While actual infidelity affects only a small percentage of marriages, the factors creating online temptation impact everyone. And we women don’t always understand why. Our men are vulnerable in ways most of us never realized. Our sons have a target on their backs. They need our support, prayer and awareness as they stand against the temptations of this culture – or as they work to heal their lives and marriages from poor choices.

The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina recently posted this video of SEBTS’ own Dr. Tracy McKenzie walking through 2 Timothy 2:2.

 

2 Timothy 2:2 is the biblical basis for our 2015 Annual Meeting at the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina and also the introduction to our “Pray for 30 Days” campaign. Won’t you join us in prayer for spiritual awakening. Visit prayfor30days.org for more!

Book Notice: “A Theology of Matthew” by Charles L. Quarles

Quarles_Matt picSoutheastern’s own Chuck Quarles, Professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology, has recently published yet another fine work in New Testament studies. Already the author of several books including The Cradle, The Cross, & The Crown and The Sermon on the Mount, Quarles recently published A Theology of Matthew: Jesus Revealed as Deliverer, King, and Incarnate Creator (P&R, 2013).

Quarles wrote the book in order to combat what he calls “the doctrinal anemia of the contemporary church.” “Doctrinal anemia,” Quarles writes, “involves ignorance of fundamental truths of the Christian faith that are essential to the salvation of individuals or necessary for the spiritual health of God’s people” (p. 1). He communicates to the reader the results of a survey he has administered regularly to college freshmen. The test does not measure their convictions, but only what they know or understand about the key doctrines of Christianity. Quarles’s findings are not heart warming: 78% think all people are basically good; 65% cannot identify the definition of new birth from a multiple-choice question; 54% think that faith in Jesus is unnecessary for salvation. The anemia continues on down the theological line (pp. 1–2).

Rather than allowing himself to descend into a state of weltscherz, Quarles aims to write biblical theology for the church. A Theology of Matthew is the first fruit of his desire to rectify things, and he launches the project by teaching us what Matthew thought of Jesus. “Rediscovery of biblical theology best begins with a rediscovery of who Jesus is and why he came. The Gospel of Matthew is an excellent place to rediscover the biblical view of Jesus” (p. 2).

Quarles does not simply describe Matthew’s Gospel or his theology. Quarles teaches readers how to study the Gospel. In part 1, he provides the foundations for this study by describing the key historical details of the Gospel––who, what, when, where, how, and why (ch. 1). He then explains the mutually interpreting ways we ought to read the Gospel (ch. 2). For instance, we do well to read the Gospel vertically and horizontally, and especially in the light of the Old Testament, which Matthew deeply relied upon.

In Parts 2–5, Quarles explores the theological themes that emerge from Matthew’s presentation of Jesus. Matthew presents Jesus as the New Moses (part 2), New David (part 3), New Abraham (part 4), and New Creator (part 5). Quarles expertly shows how these identities of Jesus––truly one, divine identity––tie together with his roles: our Savior (part 2), our King (part 3), our Founder (part 4), and our God (part 5). The back cover nicely summarizes Quarles’s approach: “Who is Jesus? Why should we worship him? This book answers these questions by surveying Matthew’s primary theological themes and how they interconnect with the rest of the Bible. Quarles focuses on Matthew’s portrait of Jesus as the Savior of sinners, the King of God’s people, the founder of a new Israel, and the incarnation of the Creator.”

Quarles has produced a coherent, clear, and moving exposition of the theology of Matthew. He has done this so that we might sit in awe of the treasures of Jesus. Yet, this is not all. “As amazing as it is to see Matthew’s awe-inspiring treasures on display, Matthew intends far more than this. . . . Matthew intends to share his treasure, not merely to show it. He longs for his treasure to become ours” (p. 193). Quarles shares this desire of Matthew, and he has expertly passed on Matthew’s theology to us so that we might truly know and worship Jesus.

Quarles also represents the commitment of SEBTS and its biblical studies faculty to serving the church through scholarship. Recent publications include but certainly are not limited to: Quarles, Andreas Köstenberger, and Scott Kellum, The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown (Broadman & Holman, 2009), and The Lion and The Lamb (B&H, 2012); Tracy McKenzie, Idolatry in the Pentateuch (Wipf & Stock, 2010); Ben Merkle edits the very helpful 40 Questions series (Kregel); Maurice Robinson, Analytical Lexicon of New Testament Greek: Revised and Updated. Co-edited with Mark House (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2012); Mark Rooker, The Ten Commandments: Ethics for the Twenty-First Century (B&H, 2010); Heath Thomas, Poetry & Theology in Lamentations: The Aesthetics of an Open Text (Sheffield, UK: Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2012); and numerous journal articles by these and others.

For those who seek to follow God’s call and keep the commands of Jesus Christ in the Great Commission, consider these SEBTS programs taught by Chuck Quarles and our other excellent biblical studies faculty.

The Bachelor of Arts in Christian Studies with a minor in Biblical Studies introduces undergraduate students to the knowledge and skills central to the work of pastors, particularly in the area of Old and New Testament competency. The Master or Arts (Biblical Languages) prepares students to serve as translators and as field supervisors for Bible translation teams. The Master of Arts (Old Testament) provides serious students with an opportunity for advanced study beyond the Master of Divinity or baccalaureate degrees.

The M.Div. with Pastoral Ministry prepares students for pastoral ministry in the local church with and is grounded in study of the Old and New Testament. The M.Div. with Christian Ministry offers the same strong core education while giving one freedom to pursue elective courses in the area of OT, NT, Hebrew and Greek. The M.Div. with Advanced Biblical Studies offers the greatest opportunity for focus in the biblical languages, preparing one for a pastoral or teaching ministry. The Th.M. in Biblical Studies equips post-M.Div. students who want to enhance their theological training, either for preparation for doctoral study or as an advanced degree for service in the church. Students can take the thesis or non-thesis tracks under the supervision of a professor in the area of Old Testament. Finally, the Ph.D. in Biblical Studies prepares students to teach the Bible and biblical languages to college or seminary students, and to write about the interpretation and theology of the OT and NT.

Click the links to find out more and apply.

 

 

An Invitation to Study Old Testament at Southeastern

One of the greatest 20th century triumphs of The Bible Obfuscation Department has been the sometime relegation of the Old Testament to the sidelines in biblical studies, theology, and preaching. The problem with such relegation is that the only “Scriptures” that Jesus, the apostles, and the New Testament authors had were the Old Testament scriptures, which they which they referred to as being divinely inspired, authoritative, and sufficient (see 2 Tim 3:16). Moreover, Jesus referenced the Law, Prophets, and Writings (i.e. Old Testament) as ultimately fulfilled in him (Luke 24:44). Therefore, if we wish to know about creation (Gen 1-2; Pss 8; 24; 100), the problem with humanity (Gen 3; cf Judges 21:25), the unfolding solution for that problem (Gen 12; 15; 17; 22; Ex 19-Deut 30; 2 Sam 7; Pss 78; 105; 106), the character of God who brings this all about (Ex 34:6-7), and the proper relationship with that God (Gen 15; Hab 2:4) in order to live a blessed life (Pss 1-2; Prov. 1:7), we ought to know the Old Testament and that in Hebrew. Knowing the Old Testament enables one to know the New Testament to know Jesus Christ in order to know and love the God who creates and redeems his people.

For this reason, Southeastern has worked to build an Old Testament faculty that will prepare our students to preach the gospel both faithfully and meaningfully. By faithfully, we mean that one will be prepared to expound the Christian Scriptures (in their entirety) accurately. By meaningfully, we mean that one will be prepared to communicate it in such a way that the audience understands it in the way the biblical author intended and with an application that fits the particular social and cultural contexts of the hearers.

In this installment, we provide a brief highlight the Old Testament faculty at Southeastern, followed by an invitation to study the Old Testament at the undergrad, grad, and post-grad levels.

Todd Borger (Ph.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is Assistant Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew. Dr. Borger served in Asia for years before coming to teach at SEBTS.

Bob Cole (Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles) is Associate Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages and author of Psalms 1 and 2: Gateway to the Psalter (Sheffield Phoenix, forthcoming) and The Shape and Message of Book III (Pss 73-89) (Sheffield Academic Press). Dr. Cole enjoys playing intramural soccer with SEBTS students, and sports a robust and enviable moustache.

Shawn Madden (Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington) is Associate Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew, Director of Library Services and author of Kings: A Handbook on the Hebrew Text (Baylor Press, forthcoming). Before coming to SEBTS, Dr. Madden served in the United States Marine Corps.

Chip McDaniel (Th.D., Dallas Theological Seminary) is Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew and author of several Greek and Hebrew interlinears for Logos Bible Software and “Mission in the Old Testament” in Mission in the NT: An Evangelical Approach (Orbis Books). Dr. McDaniel has been known to grow his beard to epic proportions, especially during the winter months.

Tracy McKenzie (Ph.D., Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary) is Assistant Professor of Biblical Studies and author of Idolatry in the Pentateuch (Wipf and Stock). Dr. McKenzie is presently working on a second Ph.D. in Germany.

Allan Moseley (Th.D., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary; Post-Doctoral Study, Duke University Divinity School) is Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew and author of Thinking Against the Grain: Developing a Biblical Worldview in a Culture of Myths (Kregel). Dr. Moseley is the pastor of Christ Baptist in Raleigh and is known as a top-shelf expository preacher.

Mark Rooker (Ph.D., Brandeis University; Additional studies: Hebrew University, Jerusalem) is Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew, author of The Ten Commandments: Ethics for the Twenty-First Century (B&H); Leviticus, NAC Commentary (B&H); Biblical Hebrew in Transition: The Language of the Book of Ezekiel (Sheffield); and co-author with Eugene Merrill, Michael Grisanti of The World and The Word: Introducing the Old Testament (B&H). Dr. Rooker is from Texas, played QB in his football days, and brings to the table a deceptively keen sense of humor.

Heath A. Thomas (Ph.D., Old Testament, University of Gloucestershire) is Assistant Professor of Old Testament and Hebrew and author of Poetry & Theology in Lamentations: The Aesthetics of an Open Text (Sheffield Phoenix Press, manuscript accepted); ‘Until He Looks Down and Sees’: The Message and Meaning of the Book of Lamentations (Grove). Dr. Thomas bears an uncanny resemblance to Patrick Jane, the lead star of the TV series The Mentalist.

Southeastern offers several degrees with a focus on the Old Testament. The Bachelor of Arts in Christian Studies with a minor in Biblical Studies introduces undergraduate students to the knowledge and skills central to the work of pastors, particularly in the area of Old and New Testament competency. The Master or Arts (Biblical Languages) prepares students to serve as translators and as field supervisors for Bible translation teams. The Master of Arts (Old Testament) provides serious students with an opportunity for advanced study beyond the Master of Divinity or baccalaureate degrees.

The M.Div. with Pastoral Ministry prepares students for pastoral ministry in the local church with and is grounded in study of the Old and New Testament. The M.Div. with Christian Ministry offers the same strong core education while giving one freedom to pursue elective courses in the area of Old Testament and Hebrew. The M.Div. with Advanced Biblical Studies offers the greatest opportunity for focus in Old Testament and Hebrew exegesis, preparing one for a pastoral or teaching ministry. The Th.M. in Biblical Studies equips post-M.Div. students who want to enhance their theological training, either for preparation for doctoral study or as an advanced degree for service in the church. Students can take the thesis or non-thesis tracks under the supervision of a professor in the area of Old Testament. Finally, the Ph.D. in Biblical Studies with a concentration in Old Testament prepares students to teach Old Testament, Hebrew, and other courses to college or seminary students, and to write about the interpretation and theology of the Old Testament.

We invite you to come study with our preaching faculty in the B. A., M.A., M.Div., Th.M., or Ph.D. programs of Southeastern. For more info visit our website (http://www.sebts.edu/) and check out the Admissions and Academics links.for mobi